Heterogeneity and changes in inequality of malaria risk after introduction of insecticide-treated bed nets in Macha, Zambia

Laura C. Norris, Douglas E. Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2007, the first free mass distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) occurred in southern Zambia. To determine the effect of ITNs on heterogeneity in biting rates, human DNA from Anopheles arabiensis blood meals was genotyped to determine the number of hosts that had contributed to the blood meals. The multiple feeding rate decreased from 18.9% pre-ITN to 9.1% post-ITN, suggesting that mosquito biting had focused onto a smaller fraction of the population. Pre-ITN, 20% of persons in a household provided 40% of blood meals, which increased to 59% post-ITN. To measure heterogeneity over a larger scale, mosquitoes were collected in 90 households in two village areas. Of these households, 25% contributed 78.1% of An. arabiensis, and households with high frequencies of An. arabiensis were significantly spatially clustered. The results indicate that substantial heterogeneity in malaria risk exists at local and household levels, and household-level heterogeneity may be influenced by interventions, such as ITNs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)710-717
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume88
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Heterogeneity and changes in inequality of malaria risk after introduction of insecticide-treated bed nets in Macha, Zambia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this