Hepatitis C virus infection is not an independent risk factor for obstructive lung disease

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Abstract

Several epidemiological studies have suggested that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the presence of obstructive lung disease (OLD). However, there is a strong link between HCV infection and tobacco abuse, a major risk factor for the development of OLD. In this study we analyzed clinical, laboratory and spirometric data from 1068 study participants to assess whether HCV infection, viremia, or HCV-associated end organ damage were associated with OLD. Demographics, risk behavior, serologic status for HCV and HIV, and spirometric measurements were collected from a cross-sectional analysis of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Linked to the IntraVenous Experience (ALIVE) study, an observational cohort of IDUs followed in Baltimore, MD since 1988. Of 1,068 participants, 890 (83%) were HCV positive and 174 (16%) met spirometric criteria for OLD. Factors independently associated with OLD were age and BMI. HCV infection, viral load and HCV-associated end organ damage were similar in participants with and without OLD. In summary, there was no independent association between markers of HCV exposure, chronicity, viremia, or HCV-associated end-organ damage with OLD. Our findings support the strong correlation between HCV status, injection drug use, and smoking. These data suggest that HCV may not be a sole contributor to the increased prevalence of OLD described in previous studies of HCV-infected individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalCOPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Chronic viral infections
  • HIV
  • Injection drug users
  • Obstructive Lung Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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