Hepatitis C virus coinfection and HIV load, CD4+ cell percentage, and clinical progression to AIDS or death among HIV-infected women: Women and infants transmission study

Ronald C. Hershow, Peter T. O'Driscoll, Ed Handelsman, Jane Pitt, George Hillyer, Leslie Serchuck, Ming Lu, Katherine T. Chen, Sigal Yawetz, Susan Pacheco, Katherine Davenny, Samuel Adeniyi-Jones, David L Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Despite previous study, it remains unclear whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection affects the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection. The Women and Infants Transmission Study provided an opportunity to assess this issue. Methods. Longitudinal data on 652 HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the study before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; 1989-1995) were analyzed. Random effects models were used to determine whether HCV coinfection was associated with different CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels over time, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the rates of clinical progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death. Results. Of 652 women, 190 (29%) were HCV infected. During follow-up, 19% of women were exposed to HAART. After controlling for indicators of disease progression (CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels determined closest to the time of delivery in pregnant women), ongoing drug use, receipt of antiretroviral therapy, and other important covariates, no differences were detected in the HIV-1 RNA levels, but the CD4+ cell percentages were slightly higher in HCV-infected women than in HCV-uninfected women. During follow-up, 48 women had progression to a first clinical AIDS-defining illness (ADI), and 26 died with no documented antecedent ADI. In multivariable analyses, HCV-infected participants did not have faster progression to a first class C AIDS-defining event or death (relative hazard, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.53). Conclusions. In this cohort, the rate of clinical progression of HIV-1 infection was not greater for HCV-infected women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)859-867
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2005

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Coinfection
Hepacivirus
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
HIV-1
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Virus Diseases
RNA
Proportional Hazards Models
Disease Progression
Pregnant Women
Confidence Intervals
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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Hepatitis C virus coinfection and HIV load, CD4+ cell percentage, and clinical progression to AIDS or death among HIV-infected women : Women and infants transmission study. / Hershow, Ronald C.; O'Driscoll, Peter T.; Handelsman, Ed; Pitt, Jane; Hillyer, George; Serchuck, Leslie; Lu, Ming; Chen, Katherine T.; Yawetz, Sigal; Pacheco, Susan; Davenny, Katherine; Adeniyi-Jones, Samuel; Thomas, David L.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 40, No. 6, 15.03.2005, p. 859-867.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hershow, RC, O'Driscoll, PT, Handelsman, E, Pitt, J, Hillyer, G, Serchuck, L, Lu, M, Chen, KT, Yawetz, S, Pacheco, S, Davenny, K, Adeniyi-Jones, S & Thomas, DL 2005, 'Hepatitis C virus coinfection and HIV load, CD4+ cell percentage, and clinical progression to AIDS or death among HIV-infected women: Women and infants transmission study', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 859-867. https://doi.org/10.1086/428121
Hershow, Ronald C. ; O'Driscoll, Peter T. ; Handelsman, Ed ; Pitt, Jane ; Hillyer, George ; Serchuck, Leslie ; Lu, Ming ; Chen, Katherine T. ; Yawetz, Sigal ; Pacheco, Susan ; Davenny, Katherine ; Adeniyi-Jones, Samuel ; Thomas, David L. / Hepatitis C virus coinfection and HIV load, CD4+ cell percentage, and clinical progression to AIDS or death among HIV-infected women : Women and infants transmission study. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 859-867.
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abstract = "Background. Despite previous study, it remains unclear whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection affects the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection. The Women and Infants Transmission Study provided an opportunity to assess this issue. Methods. Longitudinal data on 652 HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the study before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; 1989-1995) were analyzed. Random effects models were used to determine whether HCV coinfection was associated with different CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels over time, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the rates of clinical progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death. Results. Of 652 women, 190 (29{\%}) were HCV infected. During follow-up, 19{\%} of women were exposed to HAART. After controlling for indicators of disease progression (CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels determined closest to the time of delivery in pregnant women), ongoing drug use, receipt of antiretroviral therapy, and other important covariates, no differences were detected in the HIV-1 RNA levels, but the CD4+ cell percentages were slightly higher in HCV-infected women than in HCV-uninfected women. During follow-up, 48 women had progression to a first clinical AIDS-defining illness (ADI), and 26 died with no documented antecedent ADI. In multivariable analyses, HCV-infected participants did not have faster progression to a first class C AIDS-defining event or death (relative hazard, 0.75; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.37-1.53). Conclusions. In this cohort, the rate of clinical progression of HIV-1 infection was not greater for HCV-infected women.",
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T1 - Hepatitis C virus coinfection and HIV load, CD4+ cell percentage, and clinical progression to AIDS or death among HIV-infected women

T2 - Women and infants transmission study

AU - Hershow, Ronald C.

AU - O'Driscoll, Peter T.

AU - Handelsman, Ed

AU - Pitt, Jane

AU - Hillyer, George

AU - Serchuck, Leslie

AU - Lu, Ming

AU - Chen, Katherine T.

AU - Yawetz, Sigal

AU - Pacheco, Susan

AU - Davenny, Katherine

AU - Adeniyi-Jones, Samuel

AU - Thomas, David L

PY - 2005/3/15

Y1 - 2005/3/15

N2 - Background. Despite previous study, it remains unclear whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection affects the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection. The Women and Infants Transmission Study provided an opportunity to assess this issue. Methods. Longitudinal data on 652 HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the study before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; 1989-1995) were analyzed. Random effects models were used to determine whether HCV coinfection was associated with different CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels over time, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the rates of clinical progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death. Results. Of 652 women, 190 (29%) were HCV infected. During follow-up, 19% of women were exposed to HAART. After controlling for indicators of disease progression (CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels determined closest to the time of delivery in pregnant women), ongoing drug use, receipt of antiretroviral therapy, and other important covariates, no differences were detected in the HIV-1 RNA levels, but the CD4+ cell percentages were slightly higher in HCV-infected women than in HCV-uninfected women. During follow-up, 48 women had progression to a first clinical AIDS-defining illness (ADI), and 26 died with no documented antecedent ADI. In multivariable analyses, HCV-infected participants did not have faster progression to a first class C AIDS-defining event or death (relative hazard, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.53). Conclusions. In this cohort, the rate of clinical progression of HIV-1 infection was not greater for HCV-infected women.

AB - Background. Despite previous study, it remains unclear whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection affects the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection. The Women and Infants Transmission Study provided an opportunity to assess this issue. Methods. Longitudinal data on 652 HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the study before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; 1989-1995) were analyzed. Random effects models were used to determine whether HCV coinfection was associated with different CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels over time, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the rates of clinical progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death. Results. Of 652 women, 190 (29%) were HCV infected. During follow-up, 19% of women were exposed to HAART. After controlling for indicators of disease progression (CD4+ cell percentages and HIV-1 RNA levels determined closest to the time of delivery in pregnant women), ongoing drug use, receipt of antiretroviral therapy, and other important covariates, no differences were detected in the HIV-1 RNA levels, but the CD4+ cell percentages were slightly higher in HCV-infected women than in HCV-uninfected women. During follow-up, 48 women had progression to a first clinical AIDS-defining illness (ADI), and 26 died with no documented antecedent ADI. In multivariable analyses, HCV-infected participants did not have faster progression to a first class C AIDS-defining event or death (relative hazard, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.53). Conclusions. In this cohort, the rate of clinical progression of HIV-1 infection was not greater for HCV-infected women.

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