Hepatitis C virus antibody titers associated with cognitive dysfunction in an asymptomatic community-based sample

Ibtihal Ibrahim, Hala Salah, Hanan El Sayed, Hader Mansour, Ahmed Eissa, Joel Wood, Warda Fathi, Salwa Tobar, Ruben C. Gur, Raquel E. Gur, Faith Dickerson, Robert H Yolken, Wafaa El Bahaey, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with cognitive dysfunction in clinic-based studies. The risk could be attributed to factors such as antiviral medications, substance abuse, or coincidental infection. Aim: The aim was to evaluate cognitive function in relation to HCV antibody titers in a community-based sample of asymptomatic individuals at low risk for substance abuse. Method: Adults were ascertained from a community in Mansoura, Egypt, where HCV is endemic (n = 258). Cognitive performance was evaluated using the Arabic version of the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery. Substance abuse and psychopathology were also assessed. Antibodies to HCV and Toxoplasma gondii (TOX), a common protozoan that can affect cognition, were estimated using serological IgG assays. Results: The prevalence of HCV and TOX infection was 17.6% and 52.9%, respectively. HCV antibody titers were significantly associated with worse function in four cognitive tests for accuracy and three tests for speed, after adjusting for covariates (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-868
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2016

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Hepatitis C Antibodies
Viral Load
Hepacivirus
Substance-Related Disorders
Cognition
Egypt
Toxoplasmosis
Toxoplasma
Virus Diseases
Psychopathology
Antiviral Agents
Immunoglobulin G
Infection
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Computerized Neurocognitive Battery
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Toxoplasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Hepatitis C virus antibody titers associated with cognitive dysfunction in an asymptomatic community-based sample. / Ibrahim, Ibtihal; Salah, Hala; El Sayed, Hanan; Mansour, Hader; Eissa, Ahmed; Wood, Joel; Fathi, Warda; Tobar, Salwa; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.; Dickerson, Faith; Yolken, Robert H; El Bahaey, Wafaa; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 38, No. 8, 13.09.2016, p. 861-868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ibrahim, I, Salah, H, El Sayed, H, Mansour, H, Eissa, A, Wood, J, Fathi, W, Tobar, S, Gur, RC, Gur, RE, Dickerson, F, Yolken, RH, El Bahaey, W & Nimgaonkar, V 2016, 'Hepatitis C virus antibody titers associated with cognitive dysfunction in an asymptomatic community-based sample', Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 861-868. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2016.1168780
Ibrahim, Ibtihal ; Salah, Hala ; El Sayed, Hanan ; Mansour, Hader ; Eissa, Ahmed ; Wood, Joel ; Fathi, Warda ; Tobar, Salwa ; Gur, Ruben C. ; Gur, Raquel E. ; Dickerson, Faith ; Yolken, Robert H ; El Bahaey, Wafaa ; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit. / Hepatitis C virus antibody titers associated with cognitive dysfunction in an asymptomatic community-based sample. In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 2016 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 861-868.
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