Hepatitis C and the risk of kidney disease and mortality in veterans with HIV

Michael J. Fischer, Christina M. Wyatt, Kirsha Gordon, Cynthia L. Gibert, Sheldon T. Brown, David Rimland, Maria C. Rodriguez-Barradas, Amy C. Justice, Chirag R. Parikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among veterans with HIV and to evaluate independent associations of HCV and CKD with mortality. Methods: We studied a national cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving care through the Veterans Healthcare Administration from 1998 to 2004. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m)] < 60. Poisson regression was used to assess relationships between CKD, HCV, and mortality. Results: Among 23,155 HIV-infected veterans, 12% had CKD. Forty percent of the cohort was coinfected with HCV, and a higher proportion of coinfected subjects had CKD compared with monoinfected subjects (14% vs 11%, P < 0.001). During the median follow-up of 7.6 years, 37% of subjects died and a graduated increase in adjusted mortality rates occurred with lower levels of eGFR (P < 0.001). Adjusted mortality rates were consistently higher in HCV-coinfected subjects across all levels of eGFR (P < 0.001). HCV was independently associated with increased mortality (incidence rate ratio 1.23, 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.29). Conclusions: CKD is prevalent in HIV-infected veterans and associated with substantially higher mortality. Compared with their monoinfected counterparts, veterans coinfected with HCV have significantly higher rates of CKD and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-226
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Death
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis C
  • Kidney failure
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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