Hepatitis B vaccination prevalence and its predictors among Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, and multiracial adults in the national health and nutrition examination survey

John W. Ayers, Hee Soon Juon, Sunmin Lee, Eunmi Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) vaccination prevalence and its predictors were estimated among Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, and Multiracial (A-PI-NA-M) adults. Using 2005 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, estimates of HBV vaccination among A-PI-NA-M adults (N = 233) were compared with all other racial/ethnic groups. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate predictors of vaccination. Among A-PI-NA-M adults 42% (95%CI 34, 50) were HBV immunized, higher than all other racial/ethnic groups. Some college was associated with a 31% (95%CI 7, 55); a college degree with a 28% (95%CI 8, 49) increased probability of HBV vaccination relative to less education. Each 10-year increase in age was associated with an 11% (95%CI -18, -4) lower probability of HBV vaccination. Access to medical care and immigrant status were not associated with vaccination. Interventions to increase HBV vaccination should target less-educated and older A-PI-NA-M adults, as well as develop strategies so that access to care may increase vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-852
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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Keywords

  • Asian or pacific islanders
  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Liver cancer
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
  • Native Americans
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

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