Hepatitis B in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient: Epidemiology, natural history, and treatment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is common in the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV)-infected patient because of shared modes of transmission. HBV does not appear to alter HIV disease progression; however, HBV infection is more frequent and more severe in the HIV-infected population, emphasizing the importance of preventing HBV infection. The goal of anti-HBV therapy is prevention of cirrhosis because therapy does not eradicate the hepatic reservoirs (cccDNA). The approved therapies - interferon-alfa, lamivudine, and adefovir - each have a niche in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in the HIV-infected population, but none has been well-studied in this setting. As new drugs currently in clinical trials become available, therapy for chronic hepatitis B will enter the promising era of combination therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-136
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in Liver Disease
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

Keywords

  • Adefovir
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B
  • Interferon-alfa
  • Lamivudine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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