Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation

Amelia M. Arria, Emily R. Winick, Laura M. Garnier-Dykstra, Kathryn B. Vincent, Kimberly M. Caldeira, Holly Wilcox, Kevin E. O'Grady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined help seeking among 158 college students with a lifetime history of suicide ideation. Methods: Students were interviewed about episodes of psychological distress, formal treatment, and informal help seeking during adolescence and college. Results: Of the 151 students reporting any lifetime episodes of distress, 62% experienced the first episode in adolescence, and 54% had episodes in both adolescence and young adulthood. Overall, 87% received informal help, 73% received formal treatment, and 61% received both. Among the 149 who ever sought help or treatment, the most commonly reported sources of help were family (65%), friends (54%), psychiatrists (38%), and psychologists (33%). Of the 94 individuals who experienced suicide ideation in college, 44% did not seek treatment during young adulthood. Treatment barriers reflected ambivalence about treatment need or effectiveness, stigma, and financial concerns. Conclusions: Most students had some contact with treatment, but family and friends might be important gatekeepers for facilitating treatment access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1513
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume62
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Mental Health Services
Suicide
Students
Therapeutics
Psychology
Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Arria, A. M., Winick, E. R., Garnier-Dykstra, L. M., Vincent, K. B., Caldeira, K. M., Wilcox, H., & O'Grady, K. E. (2011). Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation. Psychiatric Services, 62(12), 1510-1513.

Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation. / Arria, Amelia M.; Winick, Emily R.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Wilcox, Holly; O'Grady, Kevin E.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 62, No. 12, 01.12.2011, p. 1510-1513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arria, AM, Winick, ER, Garnier-Dykstra, LM, Vincent, KB, Caldeira, KM, Wilcox, H & O'Grady, KE 2011, 'Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation', Psychiatric Services, vol. 62, no. 12, pp. 1510-1513.
Arria AM, Winick ER, Garnier-Dykstra LM, Vincent KB, Caldeira KM, Wilcox H et al. Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation. Psychiatric Services. 2011 Dec 1;62(12):1510-1513.
Arria, Amelia M. ; Winick, Emily R. ; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M. ; Vincent, Kathryn B. ; Caldeira, Kimberly M. ; Wilcox, Holly ; O'Grady, Kevin E. / Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation. In: Psychiatric Services. 2011 ; Vol. 62, No. 12. pp. 1510-1513.
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