Helicobacter pylori and Epstein-Barr virus infection and the p53 tumour suppressor pathway in gastric stump cancer compared with carcinoma in the non-operated stomach

Inge O. Baas, Bastiaan P. Van Rees, Alex Musler, Mike E. Craanen, Guido N J Tytgat, Frank M. Van Den Berg, G. Johan A Offerhaus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim - To evaluate similarities and differences between gastric stump cancer and conventional carcinoma in the non-operated stomach. Methods - 26 stump carcinomas were compared with 24 conventional stomach cancers. Stage, histological type, and demographics were comparable in the two groups. Expression of p53 and p21-Waf1/Cip1 was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by examining haematoxylin-eosin stained slides and immunohistochemistry. Epstein-Barr virus infection was evaluated by RNA in situ hybridisation. Results - Expression of p53 and p21-Waf1/Cip1 was similar in both groups and positive in more than half of the patients. H pylori infection was observed in six stump carcinomas and 17 conventional carcinomas in the intact stomach (p <0.01). RNA in situ hybridisation (EBER1-ISH) for Epstein-Barr virus was positive in nine stump carcinomas and two carcinomas in the non-operated stomach (p <0.05). Conclusions - There appear to be aetiological differences between stump carcinoma and cancer in the intact stomach. Further study of these differences may improve our understanding of gastric carcinogenesis in general.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-666
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume51
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carcinoma
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Gastric stump
  • H pylori
  • P53
  • Stomach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Baas, I. O., Van Rees, B. P., Musler, A., Craanen, M. E., Tytgat, G. N. J., Van Den Berg, F. M., & Offerhaus, G. J. A. (1998). Helicobacter pylori and Epstein-Barr virus infection and the p53 tumour suppressor pathway in gastric stump cancer compared with carcinoma in the non-operated stomach. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 51(9), 662-666.