Heightened risk of fire deaths among older African Americans and native Americans

David Bishai, Sunmin Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. We examined disparities in burn and fire injuries by age and race/ethnicity to identify disparities during the life course. Methods. Burn and fire mortality rates were disaggregated by five-year age groups, gender, and race/ethnicity from 1999 to 2004. Results. Compared with non-Hispanic white people, Native American and African American people older than 55 years of age experienced a higher risk of death from fires and burns. The rate ratio of burn/fire deaths for African Americans compared with white people was 3.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.98, 3.31) for those aged 55 years and older. The corresponding rate ratio for Native Americans compared with white people was 1.93 (95% CI 1.49, 2.46) for those aged 55 years and older. Conclusion. The especially heightened risk among minority seniors could reflect living arrangements that place them at higher risk. Heightened fire risks for minority seniors require broad attention and the development of effective interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-413
Number of pages8
JournalPublic health reports
Volume125
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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