Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women

Joanne F. Dorgan, Catherine Klifa, John A. Shepherd, Brian L. Egleston, Peter O. Kwiterovich, John H. Himes, Kelley P. Gabriel, Linda V. Horn, Linda G. Snetselaar, Victor J. Stevens, Bruce A. Barton, Alan M. Robson, Norman L. Lasser, Snehal Deshmukh, Nola M. Hylton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but determinants of breast density in young women remain largely unknown.Methods: Associations of height, adiposity and body fat distribution with percentage dense breast volume (%DBV) and absolute dense breast volume (ADBV) were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 174 healthy women, 25 to 29 years old. Adiposity and body fat distribution were measured by anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), while %DBV and ADBV were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models. All tests of statistical significance are two-sided.Results: Height was significantly positively associated with %DBV but not ADBV; for each standard deviation (SD) increase in height, %DBV increased by 18.7% in adjusted models. In contrast, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution were significantly inversely associated with %DBV; a SD increase in body mass index (BMI), percentage fat mass, waist circumference and the android:gynoid fat mass ratio (A:G ratio) was each associated significantly with a 44.4 to 47.0% decrease in %DBV after adjustment for childhood BMI and other covariates. Although associations were weaker than for %DBV, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution also were significantly inversely associated with ADBV before adjustment for childhood BMI. After adjustment for childhood BMI, however, only the DXA measures of percentage fat mass and A:G ratio remained significant; a SD increase in each was associated with a 13.8 to 19.6% decrease in ADBV. In mutually adjusted analysis, the percentage fat mass and the A:G ratio remained significantly inversely associated with %DBV, but only the A:G ratio was significantly associated with ADBV; a SD increase in the A:G ratio was associated with an 18.5% decrease in ADBV.Conclusion: Total adiposity and body fat distribution are independently inversely associated with %DBV, whereas in mutually adjusted analysis only body fat distribution (A:G ratio) remained significantly inversely associated with ADBV in young women. Research is needed to identify biological mechanisms underlying these associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberR107
JournalBreast Cancer Research
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 13 2012

Fingerprint

Body Fat Distribution
Adiposity
Breast
Fats
Body Mass Index
Photon Absorptiometry
Breast Neoplasms
Breast Density
Anthropometry
Waist Circumference
Cross-Sectional Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dorgan, J. F., Klifa, C., Shepherd, J. A., Egleston, B. L., Kwiterovich, P. O., Himes, J. H., ... Hylton, N. M. (2012). Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women. Breast Cancer Research, 14(4), [R107]. https://doi.org/10.1186/bcr3228

Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women. / Dorgan, Joanne F.; Klifa, Catherine; Shepherd, John A.; Egleston, Brian L.; Kwiterovich, Peter O.; Himes, John H.; Gabriel, Kelley P.; Horn, Linda V.; Snetselaar, Linda G.; Stevens, Victor J.; Barton, Bruce A.; Robson, Alan M.; Lasser, Norman L.; Deshmukh, Snehal; Hylton, Nola M.

In: Breast Cancer Research, Vol. 14, No. 4, R107, 13.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dorgan, JF, Klifa, C, Shepherd, JA, Egleston, BL, Kwiterovich, PO, Himes, JH, Gabriel, KP, Horn, LV, Snetselaar, LG, Stevens, VJ, Barton, BA, Robson, AM, Lasser, NL, Deshmukh, S & Hylton, NM 2012, 'Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women', Breast Cancer Research, vol. 14, no. 4, R107. https://doi.org/10.1186/bcr3228
Dorgan JF, Klifa C, Shepherd JA, Egleston BL, Kwiterovich PO, Himes JH et al. Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women. Breast Cancer Research. 2012 Jul 13;14(4). R107. https://doi.org/10.1186/bcr3228
Dorgan, Joanne F. ; Klifa, Catherine ; Shepherd, John A. ; Egleston, Brian L. ; Kwiterovich, Peter O. ; Himes, John H. ; Gabriel, Kelley P. ; Horn, Linda V. ; Snetselaar, Linda G. ; Stevens, Victor J. ; Barton, Bruce A. ; Robson, Alan M. ; Lasser, Norman L. ; Deshmukh, Snehal ; Hylton, Nola M. / Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women. In: Breast Cancer Research. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 4.
@article{cff300cab36a44d29da79372b253c896,
title = "Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women",
abstract = "Introduction: Breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but determinants of breast density in young women remain largely unknown.Methods: Associations of height, adiposity and body fat distribution with percentage dense breast volume ({\%}DBV) and absolute dense breast volume (ADBV) were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 174 healthy women, 25 to 29 years old. Adiposity and body fat distribution were measured by anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), while {\%}DBV and ADBV were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models. All tests of statistical significance are two-sided.Results: Height was significantly positively associated with {\%}DBV but not ADBV; for each standard deviation (SD) increase in height, {\%}DBV increased by 18.7{\%} in adjusted models. In contrast, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution were significantly inversely associated with {\%}DBV; a SD increase in body mass index (BMI), percentage fat mass, waist circumference and the android:gynoid fat mass ratio (A:G ratio) was each associated significantly with a 44.4 to 47.0{\%} decrease in {\%}DBV after adjustment for childhood BMI and other covariates. Although associations were weaker than for {\%}DBV, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution also were significantly inversely associated with ADBV before adjustment for childhood BMI. After adjustment for childhood BMI, however, only the DXA measures of percentage fat mass and A:G ratio remained significant; a SD increase in each was associated with a 13.8 to 19.6{\%} decrease in ADBV. In mutually adjusted analysis, the percentage fat mass and the A:G ratio remained significantly inversely associated with {\%}DBV, but only the A:G ratio was significantly associated with ADBV; a SD increase in the A:G ratio was associated with an 18.5{\%} decrease in ADBV.Conclusion: Total adiposity and body fat distribution are independently inversely associated with {\%}DBV, whereas in mutually adjusted analysis only body fat distribution (A:G ratio) remained significantly inversely associated with ADBV in young women. Research is needed to identify biological mechanisms underlying these associations.",
author = "Dorgan, {Joanne F.} and Catherine Klifa and Shepherd, {John A.} and Egleston, {Brian L.} and Kwiterovich, {Peter O.} and Himes, {John H.} and Gabriel, {Kelley P.} and Horn, {Linda V.} and Snetselaar, {Linda G.} and Stevens, {Victor J.} and Barton, {Bruce A.} and Robson, {Alan M.} and Lasser, {Norman L.} and Snehal Deshmukh and Hylton, {Nola M.}",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1186/bcr3228",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
journal = "Breast Cancer Research",
issn = "1465-5411",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Height, adiposity and body fat distribution and breast density in young women

AU - Dorgan, Joanne F.

AU - Klifa, Catherine

AU - Shepherd, John A.

AU - Egleston, Brian L.

AU - Kwiterovich, Peter O.

AU - Himes, John H.

AU - Gabriel, Kelley P.

AU - Horn, Linda V.

AU - Snetselaar, Linda G.

AU - Stevens, Victor J.

AU - Barton, Bruce A.

AU - Robson, Alan M.

AU - Lasser, Norman L.

AU - Deshmukh, Snehal

AU - Hylton, Nola M.

PY - 2012/7/13

Y1 - 2012/7/13

N2 - Introduction: Breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but determinants of breast density in young women remain largely unknown.Methods: Associations of height, adiposity and body fat distribution with percentage dense breast volume (%DBV) and absolute dense breast volume (ADBV) were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 174 healthy women, 25 to 29 years old. Adiposity and body fat distribution were measured by anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), while %DBV and ADBV were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models. All tests of statistical significance are two-sided.Results: Height was significantly positively associated with %DBV but not ADBV; for each standard deviation (SD) increase in height, %DBV increased by 18.7% in adjusted models. In contrast, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution were significantly inversely associated with %DBV; a SD increase in body mass index (BMI), percentage fat mass, waist circumference and the android:gynoid fat mass ratio (A:G ratio) was each associated significantly with a 44.4 to 47.0% decrease in %DBV after adjustment for childhood BMI and other covariates. Although associations were weaker than for %DBV, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution also were significantly inversely associated with ADBV before adjustment for childhood BMI. After adjustment for childhood BMI, however, only the DXA measures of percentage fat mass and A:G ratio remained significant; a SD increase in each was associated with a 13.8 to 19.6% decrease in ADBV. In mutually adjusted analysis, the percentage fat mass and the A:G ratio remained significantly inversely associated with %DBV, but only the A:G ratio was significantly associated with ADBV; a SD increase in the A:G ratio was associated with an 18.5% decrease in ADBV.Conclusion: Total adiposity and body fat distribution are independently inversely associated with %DBV, whereas in mutually adjusted analysis only body fat distribution (A:G ratio) remained significantly inversely associated with ADBV in young women. Research is needed to identify biological mechanisms underlying these associations.

AB - Introduction: Breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but determinants of breast density in young women remain largely unknown.Methods: Associations of height, adiposity and body fat distribution with percentage dense breast volume (%DBV) and absolute dense breast volume (ADBV) were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 174 healthy women, 25 to 29 years old. Adiposity and body fat distribution were measured by anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), while %DBV and ADBV were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models. All tests of statistical significance are two-sided.Results: Height was significantly positively associated with %DBV but not ADBV; for each standard deviation (SD) increase in height, %DBV increased by 18.7% in adjusted models. In contrast, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution were significantly inversely associated with %DBV; a SD increase in body mass index (BMI), percentage fat mass, waist circumference and the android:gynoid fat mass ratio (A:G ratio) was each associated significantly with a 44.4 to 47.0% decrease in %DBV after adjustment for childhood BMI and other covariates. Although associations were weaker than for %DBV, all measures of adiposity and body fat distribution also were significantly inversely associated with ADBV before adjustment for childhood BMI. After adjustment for childhood BMI, however, only the DXA measures of percentage fat mass and A:G ratio remained significant; a SD increase in each was associated with a 13.8 to 19.6% decrease in ADBV. In mutually adjusted analysis, the percentage fat mass and the A:G ratio remained significantly inversely associated with %DBV, but only the A:G ratio was significantly associated with ADBV; a SD increase in the A:G ratio was associated with an 18.5% decrease in ADBV.Conclusion: Total adiposity and body fat distribution are independently inversely associated with %DBV, whereas in mutually adjusted analysis only body fat distribution (A:G ratio) remained significantly inversely associated with ADBV in young women. Research is needed to identify biological mechanisms underlying these associations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866176801&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866176801&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/bcr3228

DO - 10.1186/bcr3228

M3 - Article

C2 - 22800711

AN - SCOPUS:84866176801

VL - 14

JO - Breast Cancer Research

JF - Breast Cancer Research

SN - 1465-5411

IS - 4

M1 - R107

ER -