Heat treatment of expressed breast milk is a feasible option for feeding HIV-exposed, uninfected children after 6 months of age in rural Zimbabwe

Mduduzi N N Mbuya, Jean Hawes Humphrey, Florence Majo, Bernard Chasekwa, Alison Jenkins, Kiersten Israel-Ballard, Monica Muti, Keriann H. Paul, Rufaro C. Madzima, Lawrence Hale Moulton, Rebecca J. Stoltzfus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the context of a prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV program promoting exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) to 6 mo and offering HIV-PCR testing at ∼6 mo, we ascertained the feasibility of expressing and heat-treating (EHT) all breast milk fed to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants following 6 mo of EBF. Twenty mother-baby pairs were enrolled from a hospital in rural Zimbabwe. Research nurses provided lactation, EHT, and complementary feeding counseling through 21 home visits conducted over an 8-wk period and collected quantitative and qualitative data on the mothers' EHT experiences, children's diets, and anthropometric measurements. Mothers kept daily logs of EHT volumes and direct breast-feeding episodes. Mothers successfully initiated and sustained EHT for 4.5 mo (range, 1-11 mo), feeding 426 ± 227 mL/d (mean ± SD). By wk 2 of follow-up, children were receiving EHT and Nutributter-enriched complementary foods that satisfied 100% of their energy requirements. During the 8-wk follow-up period, no growth faltering was experienced [changes in weight-for-age, weight-for-length, and length-for-age Z scores = +0.03 ± 0.50; +0.77 ± 1.59; and +0.02 ± 0.85 (mean ± SD), respectively]. Stigma was not a major deterrent, likely due to a social marketing campaign for EBF that promoted EHT as a practice to sustain breast-feeding for all women. This study provides evidence that resource-poor rural women can initiate and sustain EHT given family and health systems support. EHT provides a strategy for improving the diets of HIV-exposed but uninfected children after direct breast-feeding has ceased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1481-1488
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume140
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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Zimbabwe
Human Milk
Hot Temperature
HIV
Breast Feeding
Mothers
Therapeutics
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Social Marketing
Fortified Food
Diet
Weights and Measures
Rural Hospitals
House Calls
Family Health
Lactation
Counseling
Nurses
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

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Heat treatment of expressed breast milk is a feasible option for feeding HIV-exposed, uninfected children after 6 months of age in rural Zimbabwe. / Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Humphrey, Jean Hawes; Majo, Florence; Chasekwa, Bernard; Jenkins, Alison; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Muti, Monica; Paul, Keriann H.; Madzima, Rufaro C.; Moulton, Lawrence Hale; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 140, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1481-1488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mbuya, MNN, Humphrey, JH, Majo, F, Chasekwa, B, Jenkins, A, Israel-Ballard, K, Muti, M, Paul, KH, Madzima, RC, Moulton, LH & Stoltzfus, RJ 2010, 'Heat treatment of expressed breast milk is a feasible option for feeding HIV-exposed, uninfected children after 6 months of age in rural Zimbabwe', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 8, pp. 1481-1488. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.122457
Mbuya, Mduduzi N N ; Humphrey, Jean Hawes ; Majo, Florence ; Chasekwa, Bernard ; Jenkins, Alison ; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten ; Muti, Monica ; Paul, Keriann H. ; Madzima, Rufaro C. ; Moulton, Lawrence Hale ; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J. / Heat treatment of expressed breast milk is a feasible option for feeding HIV-exposed, uninfected children after 6 months of age in rural Zimbabwe. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 140, No. 8. pp. 1481-1488.
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