Heart failure in women

An equal opportunity player in the expanding epidemic of heart failure

Gerin R. Stevens, Jill Kalman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Heart failure has been described as an epidemic with increasing incidence and prevalence with the aging of the general population. Sex plays an important role in heart failure management given that women with heart failure typically are older, have nonischemic etiologies more often, and have better ventricular function than men with heart failure. This translates into better outcomes for women regardless of the cause of heart failure. Important differences exist in disease in women and men admitted with heart failure, and diagnostic and treatment strategies significantly differ. Despite a National Institutes of Health mandate in 1993, women are still underrepresented in clinical trials, making it difficult to extrapolate treatment data in a meaningful way.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-216
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Failure
Ventricular Function
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Clinical Trials
Incidence
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Heart failure in women : An equal opportunity player in the expanding epidemic of heart failure. / Stevens, Gerin R.; Kalman, Jill.

In: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2008, p. 210-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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