Healthcare providers as sources of vaccine-preventable diseases

Emily Sydnor, Trish M. Perl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases may be introduced into the healthcare setting and pose a serious risk to vulnerable populations including immunocompromised patients. Healthcare providers (HCPs) are exposed to these pathogens through their daily tasks and may serve as a reservoir for ongoing disease transmission in the healthcare setting. The primary method of protection from work-related infection risk is vaccination that protects not only an individual HCP from disease, but also subsequent patients in contact with that HCP. Individual HCPs and healthcare institutions must balance the ethical and professional responsibility to protect their patients from nosocomial transmission of preventable infections with HCP autonomy. This article reviews known cases of HCP-to-patient transmission of the most common vaccine-preventable infections encountered in the healthcare setting including hepatitis B virus, influenza virus, Bordetella pertussis, varicella-zoster virus, measles, mumps and rubella virus. The impact of HCP vaccination on patient care and current recommendations for HCP vaccination against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases are also reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4814-4822
Number of pages9
JournalVaccine
Volume32
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2014

Fingerprint

Health Personnel
health services
Vaccines
vaccines
Delivery of Health Care
Vaccination
Communicable Diseases
Disease Reservoirs
vaccination
disease transmission
Mumps virus
Rubella virus
Bordetella pertussis
Measles virus
infectious diseases
Human Herpesvirus 3
Infectious Disease Transmission
Immunocompromised Host
Vulnerable Populations
Infection

Keywords

  • Healthcare provider
  • Infection control and prevention
  • Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Healthcare providers as sources of vaccine-preventable diseases. / Sydnor, Emily; Perl, Trish M.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 32, No. 38, 27.08.2014, p. 4814-4822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sydnor, Emily ; Perl, Trish M. / Healthcare providers as sources of vaccine-preventable diseases. In: Vaccine. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 38. pp. 4814-4822.
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