Healthcare provider interaction and other predictors of long-acting reversible contraception adoption among women in Nigeria

Naira Kalra, John Ayankola, Stella Babalola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To test the association between healthcare provider communication and adoption of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) among women in Nigeria. Methods: The present cross-sectional observational secondary analysis included women aged 18–49 who were interviewed between June 1 and July 31, 2014, at selected family planning sites in Ibadan and Kaduna, Nigeria. A multivariate generalized estimating equation was utilized to assess the predictors of LARC adoption. Results: 597 women were interviewed, and the study showed that each unit increase on the GATHER index—a self-reported measure of interaction with the provider—was significantly associated with a 16% increased likelihood (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–1.32) of adopting LARCs. Joint decision making with a partner (AOR 1.51, 95% CI 1.0–2.20), desire to have children in the next 2 years (AOR 0.36, 95% CI 0.18–0.74), whether or not a pregnancy in the next 6 months would be a problem (AOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.16–2.46), and LARC use in the past (AOR 4.15, 95% CI 1.19–14.50) were associated with LARC uptake. Conclusion: Improved patient–provider communication involving patient preferences, information about all methods of contraception, and planned follow-up could play a central role in increasing the demand for, and uptake of, LARCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Domestic violence
  • Family planning
  • Healthcare provider
  • LARC
  • Provider communication
  • Sexual and reproductive health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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