Health status of mexican-origin persons: Do proxy measures of acculturation advance our understanding of health disparities?

Olivia Carter-Pokras, Ruth E. Zambrana, Gillermina Yankelvich, Maria Estrada, Carlos Castillo-Salgado, Alexander N. Ortega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This paper compares select health status indicators between the U.S. and Mexico, and within the Mexican-origin population using proxy measures of acculturation. Methods: Statistical data were abstracted and a Medline literature review conducted of English-language epidemiologic articles on Mexican-origin groups published during 1976-2005. Results: U.S.-born Mexican-Americans have higher morbidity and mortality compared to Mexico-born immigrants. Mexico has lower healthcare resources, life expectancy, and circulatory system and cancer mortality rates, but similar infant immunization rates compared to the U.S. Along the U.S.-Mexico border, the population on the U.S. side has better health status than the Mexican side. The longer in the U.S., the more likely Mexican-born immigrants engage in behaviors that are not health promoting. Conclusions: Researchers should consider SEP, community norms, behavioral risk and protective factors when studying Mexican-origin groups. It is not spendingtime in the U.S. that worsens health outcomes but rather changes in health promoting behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-488
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Proxy
Mexico
Health Status
Health
Health Status Indicators
Mortality
Cardiovascular System
Life Expectancy
Population
Immunization
Language
Research Personnel
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Emigration and immigration
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Mexican Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Health status of mexican-origin persons : Do proxy measures of acculturation advance our understanding of health disparities? / Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Zambrana, Ruth E.; Yankelvich, Gillermina; Estrada, Maria; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos; Ortega, Alexander N.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, Vol. 10, No. 6, 2008, p. 475-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carter-Pokras, Olivia ; Zambrana, Ruth E. ; Yankelvich, Gillermina ; Estrada, Maria ; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos ; Ortega, Alexander N. / Health status of mexican-origin persons : Do proxy measures of acculturation advance our understanding of health disparities?. In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2008 ; Vol. 10, No. 6. pp. 475-488.
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