Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices: mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries

Debra Jackson, Lisa Durrant, Emily Bishop, Helen Walthall, Ria Betteridge, Sarah Gardner, Wendy Coulton, Marie Hutchinson, Stephen Neville, Patricia M Davidson, Kim Usher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Health care within the home setting is a vital and growing component of pressure injury (PI) prevention and management. Objectives: To describe the use of health services and pressure-redistributing devices in community dwelling patients with PI’s. Design: Mixed-methods collective case study of a defined, diverse geographic postcode area in the United Kingdom. Methods: Quantitative retrospective analysis of electronic and paper medical records of adult PI patients from 2015 district nursing reports. Qualitative semi-structured interviews of community dwelling adult patients receiving, or received, treatment for PI in 2016. Results: Mandatory reports (n = 103) revealed that 90 patients were supplied with a variety of pressure-redistributing devices but only one-third of patients used the equipment as recommended. Qualitative interviews (n = 12), reported to COREQ guidelines, revealed that patients felt reliant on community health services, and were concerned about the consistency of their care. Conclusions: Authentic patient involvement is required to provide care and interventions that are acceptable to PI patients and can be incorporated into self-care strategies and effectively monitored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-389
Number of pages12
JournalContemporary Nurse
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2017

Fingerprint

Independent Living
Health Services
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries
Interviews
Patient Participation
Community Health Services
Electronic Health Records
Self Care
Nursing
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • community care
  • mixed methods research
  • patient experience
  • patient voice
  • Pressure injury
  • pressure ulcer
  • pressure-redistributing equipment
  • pressure-relieving equipment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices : mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries. / Jackson, Debra; Durrant, Lisa; Bishop, Emily; Walthall, Helen; Betteridge, Ria; Gardner, Sarah; Coulton, Wendy; Hutchinson, Marie; Neville, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia M; Usher, Kim.

In: Contemporary Nurse, Vol. 53, No. 3, 04.05.2017, p. 378-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jackson, D, Durrant, L, Bishop, E, Walthall, H, Betteridge, R, Gardner, S, Coulton, W, Hutchinson, M, Neville, S, Davidson, PM & Usher, K 2017, 'Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices: mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 53, no. 3, pp. 378-389. https://doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2017.1364973
Jackson, Debra ; Durrant, Lisa ; Bishop, Emily ; Walthall, Helen ; Betteridge, Ria ; Gardner, Sarah ; Coulton, Wendy ; Hutchinson, Marie ; Neville, Stephen ; Davidson, Patricia M ; Usher, Kim. / Health service provision and the use of pressure-redistributing devices : mixed methods study of community dwelling individuals with pressure injuries. In: Contemporary Nurse. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 378-389.
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