Health-Related Quality of Life is Reduced in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

Ellen Mahar Mowry, Laura J. Julian, Sunny Im-Wang, Dorothee Chabas, Alice J. Galvin, Jonathan B. Strober, Emmanuelle Waubant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The health-related quality of life of children with multiple sclerosis was compared with that of healthy children and of those with other neurologic diseases. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Version 4.0 was administered to children with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome and their parents (proxy reporters) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Regional Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. Scores were compared with those of siblings and to those of children seen at the UCSF Pediatric Muscular Dystrophy Association Center. After adjustment for age and sex, children with multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome (P = 0.003) and their parents (P = 0.001) reported worse overall health-related quality of life than their siblings. Although overall scores for those with early multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome were better than for children with neuromuscular disease, their self-reported psychosocial scores were similar. The main predictor of reduced self-reported health-related quality of life among children with multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome was greater neurologic disability, whereas parents reported worse scores for girls, older children, and those with longer disease duration. Although it is better than for children with chronic neuromuscular diseases, children with multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome have substantial reductions in health-related quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-102
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Quality of Life
Pediatrics
Neuromuscular Diseases
San Francisco
Parents
Siblings
Muscular Dystrophies
Proxy
Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System
Chronic Disease
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Mowry, E. M., Julian, L. J., Im-Wang, S., Chabas, D., Galvin, A. J., Strober, J. B., & Waubant, E. (2010). Health-Related Quality of Life is Reduced in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis. Pediatric Neurology, 43(2), 97-102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2010.03.007

Health-Related Quality of Life is Reduced in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis. / Mowry, Ellen Mahar; Julian, Laura J.; Im-Wang, Sunny; Chabas, Dorothee; Galvin, Alice J.; Strober, Jonathan B.; Waubant, Emmanuelle.

In: Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 43, No. 2, 08.2010, p. 97-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mowry, EM, Julian, LJ, Im-Wang, S, Chabas, D, Galvin, AJ, Strober, JB & Waubant, E 2010, 'Health-Related Quality of Life is Reduced in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis', Pediatric Neurology, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 97-102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2010.03.007
Mowry, Ellen Mahar ; Julian, Laura J. ; Im-Wang, Sunny ; Chabas, Dorothee ; Galvin, Alice J. ; Strober, Jonathan B. ; Waubant, Emmanuelle. / Health-Related Quality of Life is Reduced in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis. In: Pediatric Neurology. 2010 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 97-102.
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