Health insurance coverage is associated with access to substance use treatment among individuals with injection drug use: Evidence from a 12-year prospective study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Understand how insurance impacts access to services among people who have injected drugs. Methods: 1748 adults who have injected drugs were assessed at twice-annual study visits between 2006 and 2017 (18,869 visits). Use of specialty substance use treatment, receipt of buprenorphine, and having a regular source of medical care were assessed for association with concurrent insurance coverage. Random intercept logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results: When participants acquired insurance, they were more likely to report specialty substance use treatment (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.5), a buprenorphine prescription (aOR 3.3, 95% CI 2.0 to 5.5), and a regular source of medical care (aOR 6.3, 95% CI 5.1 to 7.8). Conclusion: Insurance is associated with increased use of three important services for individuals who inject drugs. Implications: Expanding insurance may facilitate access to substance use treatment and other needed health services.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages75-81
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume96
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Insurance Coverage
Health Insurance
Insurance
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Buprenorphine
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Health Services
Prescriptions
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Injection drug use
  • Insurance
  • Substance use treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{b365ea1b981e4a18aa88aac0d70f601a,
title = "Health insurance coverage is associated with access to substance use treatment among individuals with injection drug use: Evidence from a 12-year prospective study",
abstract = "Objective: Understand how insurance impacts access to services among people who have injected drugs. Methods: 1748 adults who have injected drugs were assessed at twice-annual study visits between 2006 and 2017 (18,869 visits). Use of specialty substance use treatment, receipt of buprenorphine, and having a regular source of medical care were assessed for association with concurrent insurance coverage. Random intercept logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results: When participants acquired insurance, they were more likely to report specialty substance use treatment (aOR 2.0, 95{\%} CI 1.6 to 2.5), a buprenorphine prescription (aOR 3.3, 95{\%} CI 2.0 to 5.5), and a regular source of medical care (aOR 6.3, 95{\%} CI 5.1 to 7.8). Conclusion: Insurance is associated with increased use of three important services for individuals who inject drugs. Implications: Expanding insurance may facilitate access to substance use treatment and other needed health services.",
keywords = "Cohort study, Injection drug use, Insurance, Substance use treatment",
author = "Feder, {Kenneth A.} and Noa Krawczyk and Ramin Mojtabai and Crum, {Rosa M} and Kirk, {Gregory D} and Mehta, {Shruti Hemendra}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsat.2018.08.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "75--81",
journal = "Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment",
issn = "0740-5472",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Health insurance coverage is associated with access to substance use treatment among individuals with injection drug use

T2 - Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment

AU - Feder, Kenneth A.

AU - Krawczyk, Noa

AU - Mojtabai, Ramin

AU - Crum, Rosa M

AU - Kirk, Gregory D

AU - Mehta, Shruti Hemendra

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: Understand how insurance impacts access to services among people who have injected drugs. Methods: 1748 adults who have injected drugs were assessed at twice-annual study visits between 2006 and 2017 (18,869 visits). Use of specialty substance use treatment, receipt of buprenorphine, and having a regular source of medical care were assessed for association with concurrent insurance coverage. Random intercept logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results: When participants acquired insurance, they were more likely to report specialty substance use treatment (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.5), a buprenorphine prescription (aOR 3.3, 95% CI 2.0 to 5.5), and a regular source of medical care (aOR 6.3, 95% CI 5.1 to 7.8). Conclusion: Insurance is associated with increased use of three important services for individuals who inject drugs. Implications: Expanding insurance may facilitate access to substance use treatment and other needed health services.

AB - Objective: Understand how insurance impacts access to services among people who have injected drugs. Methods: 1748 adults who have injected drugs were assessed at twice-annual study visits between 2006 and 2017 (18,869 visits). Use of specialty substance use treatment, receipt of buprenorphine, and having a regular source of medical care were assessed for association with concurrent insurance coverage. Random intercept logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results: When participants acquired insurance, they were more likely to report specialty substance use treatment (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.5), a buprenorphine prescription (aOR 3.3, 95% CI 2.0 to 5.5), and a regular source of medical care (aOR 6.3, 95% CI 5.1 to 7.8). Conclusion: Insurance is associated with increased use of three important services for individuals who inject drugs. Implications: Expanding insurance may facilitate access to substance use treatment and other needed health services.

KW - Cohort study

KW - Injection drug use

KW - Insurance

KW - Substance use treatment

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