Health information technology in screening and treatment of child obesity: A systematic review

Anna Jo Smith, Áine Skow, Joann N Bodurtha, Sanjay Kinra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States, yet screening and treatment are often inaccessible or ineffective. Health information technology (IT) may improve the quality, efficiency, and reach of chronic disease management. The objective of this study was to review the effect of health IT (electronic health records [EHRs], telemedicine, text message or telephone support) on patient outcomes and care processes in pediatric obesity management. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials were searched from January 2006 to April 2012. Controlled trials, before-and-after studies, and cross-sectional studies were included if they used IT to deliver obesity screening or treatment to children aged 2 to 18 and reported impact on patient outcomes (BMI, dietary or physical activity behavior change) or care processes (BMI screening, comorbidity testing, diet, or physical activity counseling). Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed trial quality. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. EHR use was associated with increased BMI screening rates in 5 of 8 studies. Telemedicine counseling was associated with changes in BMI percentile similar to that of in-person counseling and improved treatment access in 2 studies. Text message or telephone support was associated with weight loss maintenance in 1 of 3 studies. CONCLUSIONS: To date, health IT interventions have improved access to obesity treatment and rates of screening. However, the impact on weight loss and other health outcomes remains understudied and inconsistent. More interactive and time-intensive interventions may enhance health IT's clinical effectiveness in chronic disease management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume131
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Medical Informatics
Pediatric Obesity
Communication Aids for Disabled
Text Messaging
Counseling
Telemedicine
Electronic Health Records
Disease Management
Weight Loss
Chronic Disease
Obesity
Exercise
Health
Therapeutics
Registries
Comorbidity
Patient Care
Cross-Sectional Studies
Maintenance
Diet

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Child
  • Decision support systems
  • Electronic health records
  • Information technology
  • Obesity
  • Review
  • Telemedicine
  • Text messaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Health information technology in screening and treatment of child obesity : A systematic review. / Smith, Anna Jo; Skow, Áine; Bodurtha, Joann N; Kinra, Sanjay.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 131, No. 3, 03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7eb17d4174ad437ab717ecb3a1989006,
title = "Health information technology in screening and treatment of child obesity: A systematic review",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States, yet screening and treatment are often inaccessible or ineffective. Health information technology (IT) may improve the quality, efficiency, and reach of chronic disease management. The objective of this study was to review the effect of health IT (electronic health records [EHRs], telemedicine, text message or telephone support) on patient outcomes and care processes in pediatric obesity management. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials were searched from January 2006 to April 2012. Controlled trials, before-and-after studies, and cross-sectional studies were included if they used IT to deliver obesity screening or treatment to children aged 2 to 18 and reported impact on patient outcomes (BMI, dietary or physical activity behavior change) or care processes (BMI screening, comorbidity testing, diet, or physical activity counseling). Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed trial quality. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. EHR use was associated with increased BMI screening rates in 5 of 8 studies. Telemedicine counseling was associated with changes in BMI percentile similar to that of in-person counseling and improved treatment access in 2 studies. Text message or telephone support was associated with weight loss maintenance in 1 of 3 studies. CONCLUSIONS: To date, health IT interventions have improved access to obesity treatment and rates of screening. However, the impact on weight loss and other health outcomes remains understudied and inconsistent. More interactive and time-intensive interventions may enhance health IT's clinical effectiveness in chronic disease management.",
keywords = "BMI, Child, Decision support systems, Electronic health records, Information technology, Obesity, Review, Telemedicine, Text messaging",
author = "Smith, {Anna Jo} and {\'A}ine Skow and Bodurtha, {Joann N} and Sanjay Kinra",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2012-2011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health information technology in screening and treatment of child obesity

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Smith, Anna Jo

AU - Skow, Áine

AU - Bodurtha, Joann N

AU - Kinra, Sanjay

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States, yet screening and treatment are often inaccessible or ineffective. Health information technology (IT) may improve the quality, efficiency, and reach of chronic disease management. The objective of this study was to review the effect of health IT (electronic health records [EHRs], telemedicine, text message or telephone support) on patient outcomes and care processes in pediatric obesity management. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials were searched from January 2006 to April 2012. Controlled trials, before-and-after studies, and cross-sectional studies were included if they used IT to deliver obesity screening or treatment to children aged 2 to 18 and reported impact on patient outcomes (BMI, dietary or physical activity behavior change) or care processes (BMI screening, comorbidity testing, diet, or physical activity counseling). Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed trial quality. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. EHR use was associated with increased BMI screening rates in 5 of 8 studies. Telemedicine counseling was associated with changes in BMI percentile similar to that of in-person counseling and improved treatment access in 2 studies. Text message or telephone support was associated with weight loss maintenance in 1 of 3 studies. CONCLUSIONS: To date, health IT interventions have improved access to obesity treatment and rates of screening. However, the impact on weight loss and other health outcomes remains understudied and inconsistent. More interactive and time-intensive interventions may enhance health IT's clinical effectiveness in chronic disease management.

AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is a major problem in the United States, yet screening and treatment are often inaccessible or ineffective. Health information technology (IT) may improve the quality, efficiency, and reach of chronic disease management. The objective of this study was to review the effect of health IT (electronic health records [EHRs], telemedicine, text message or telephone support) on patient outcomes and care processes in pediatric obesity management. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials were searched from January 2006 to April 2012. Controlled trials, before-and-after studies, and cross-sectional studies were included if they used IT to deliver obesity screening or treatment to children aged 2 to 18 and reported impact on patient outcomes (BMI, dietary or physical activity behavior change) or care processes (BMI screening, comorbidity testing, diet, or physical activity counseling). Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed trial quality. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. EHR use was associated with increased BMI screening rates in 5 of 8 studies. Telemedicine counseling was associated with changes in BMI percentile similar to that of in-person counseling and improved treatment access in 2 studies. Text message or telephone support was associated with weight loss maintenance in 1 of 3 studies. CONCLUSIONS: To date, health IT interventions have improved access to obesity treatment and rates of screening. However, the impact on weight loss and other health outcomes remains understudied and inconsistent. More interactive and time-intensive interventions may enhance health IT's clinical effectiveness in chronic disease management.

KW - BMI

KW - Child

KW - Decision support systems

KW - Electronic health records

KW - Information technology

KW - Obesity

KW - Review

KW - Telemedicine

KW - Text messaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874641594&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874641594&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2012-2011

DO - 10.1542/peds.2012-2011

M3 - Article

C2 - 23382447

AN - SCOPUS:84874641594

VL - 131

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 3

ER -