Health consequences of using smokeless tobacco: Summary of the Advisory Committee's report to the Surgeon General

J. W. Cullen, W. Blot, J. Henningfield, G. Boyd, R. Mecklenburg, M. M. Massey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the United States, smokeless tobacco is used predominantly in the forms of chewing tobacco and snuff. During the past 20 years, the production and consumption of these products have risen significantly in marked contrast to the decline in smokeless tobacco use during the first half of the century. National estimates indicate that more than 12 million persons age 12 and older in the United States used some form of smokeless tobacco in 1985, and half of these were regular users. The highest rates of smokeless tobacco use occurred among adolescent and young adult males. Examination of the relevant epidemiologic, experimental, and clinical data revealed that oral use of smokeless tobacco is a significant health risk. This behaviour can cause cancer in humans, and the evidence is strongest for cancer of the oral cavity, particularly at the site of tobacco placement. Smokeless tobacco use can also lead to the development of noncancerous oral conditions, particularly oral leukoplakias and gingival recession. Further, the levels of nicotine in the body resulting from smokeless tobacco can lead to nicotine addiction and dependence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-373
Number of pages19
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume101
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Cullen, J. W., Blot, W., Henningfield, J., Boyd, G., Mecklenburg, R., & Massey, M. M. (1986). Health consequences of using smokeless tobacco: Summary of the Advisory Committee's report to the Surgeon General. Public Health Reports, 101(4), 355-373.