Health center trends, 1994-2001: What do they portend for the federal growth initiative?

Ann S. O'Malley, Christopher B. Forrest, Robert M. Politzer, John T. Wulu, Leiyu Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Federal Health Center Growth Initiative aims to increase community health centers' (CHCs') capacity by 60 percent from 2002 to 2006. This study investigates how primary care delivery changed and sustained its growth during 1994-2001. Findings reveal a rise in the number of patients and maintenance of their visit rate. People ages 41-64 accounted for the highest percentage of visits in 2001, and continuity of care improved. There were no disparities in visit-based preventive services delivery by race/ethnicity or insurance status. Continued growth under the initiative is likely to help reduce health disparities and improve care for the underserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-472
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Health
trend
Growth
health
Healthcare Disparities
Community Health Centers
Continuity of Patient Care
Insurance Coverage
insurance
Primary Health Care
continuity
ethnicity
Maintenance
community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Health center trends, 1994-2001 : What do they portend for the federal growth initiative? / O'Malley, Ann S.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Politzer, Robert M.; Wulu, John T.; Shi, Leiyu.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 24, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 465-472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Malley, Ann S. ; Forrest, Christopher B. ; Politzer, Robert M. ; Wulu, John T. ; Shi, Leiyu. / Health center trends, 1994-2001 : What do they portend for the federal growth initiative?. In: Health Affairs. 2005 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 465-472.
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