Health Care Utilization in Elderly Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Population-based Study

Geoffrey C. Nguyen, Lisa Sheng, Eric I. Benchimol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There is an increasing burden of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among the elderly. We sought to characterize health care utilization of elderly onset IBD. Methods: We identified incident IBD cases in Ontario, Canada between 1999 and 2008 and categorized subjects by age at diagnosis as young (18-40 yr), middle-age (41-64 yr), and elderly (≥65 yr). We compared IBD-specific health utilization indicators, including outpatient visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Results: The elderly accounted for 8.1% (N 725) and 11.6% (N 1749) of incident Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), respectively. They were less likely than young adults to have any IBD-specific gastroenterology visit in the first year after diagnosis (CD, 63% versus 71%, P <0.001; UC, 63% versus 69%, P <0.001). They less frequently received continuous gastroenterology care (CD, 36% versus 46%, P <0.001; UC, 33% versus 43%, P <0.001). Elderly patients with IBD were less likely than young adults to require an IBD-specific emergency department visit in the first year (CD, 8.8% versus 18.5%, P <0.001; UC, 7.8% versus 11.6%, P <0.001). Similarly, elderly patients with CD exhibited lower hospitalization rates (incidence rate ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.65). Hospitalization rates were modestly higher among those elderly patients with UC compared with young adults during the first year (incidence rate ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.28), but this association reversed thereafter (incidence rate ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.57-0.71). Conclusions: Elderly patients with IBD exhibited lower IBD-specific health care utilization than young adults, which may reflect a multitude of factors including more benign disease and differential health care access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)777-782
Number of pages6
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Population
Young Adult
Hospitalization
Gastroenterology
Confidence Intervals
Hospital Emergency Service
Incidence
Ontario
Canada
Outpatients
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • elderly
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Health Care Utilization in Elderly Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Population-based Study. / Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Sheng, Lisa; Benchimol, Eric I.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 4, 06.03.2015, p. 777-782.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, Geoffrey C. ; Sheng, Lisa ; Benchimol, Eric I. / Health Care Utilization in Elderly Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Population-based Study. In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 777-782.
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abstract = "Background: There is an increasing burden of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among the elderly. We sought to characterize health care utilization of elderly onset IBD. Methods: We identified incident IBD cases in Ontario, Canada between 1999 and 2008 and categorized subjects by age at diagnosis as young (18-40 yr), middle-age (41-64 yr), and elderly (≥65 yr). We compared IBD-specific health utilization indicators, including outpatient visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Results: The elderly accounted for 8.1{\%} (N 725) and 11.6{\%} (N 1749) of incident Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), respectively. They were less likely than young adults to have any IBD-specific gastroenterology visit in the first year after diagnosis (CD, 63{\%} versus 71{\%}, P <0.001; UC, 63{\%} versus 69{\%}, P <0.001). They less frequently received continuous gastroenterology care (CD, 36{\%} versus 46{\%}, P <0.001; UC, 33{\%} versus 43{\%}, P <0.001). Elderly patients with IBD were less likely than young adults to require an IBD-specific emergency department visit in the first year (CD, 8.8{\%} versus 18.5{\%}, P <0.001; UC, 7.8{\%} versus 11.6{\%}, P <0.001). Similarly, elderly patients with CD exhibited lower hospitalization rates (incidence rate ratio, 0.62; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.59-0.65). Hospitalization rates were modestly higher among those elderly patients with UC compared with young adults during the first year (incidence rate ratio, 1.14; 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.02-1.28), but this association reversed thereafter (incidence rate ratio, 0.64; 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.57-0.71). Conclusions: Elderly patients with IBD exhibited lower IBD-specific health care utilization than young adults, which may reflect a multitude of factors including more benign disease and differential health care access.",
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N2 - Background: There is an increasing burden of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among the elderly. We sought to characterize health care utilization of elderly onset IBD. Methods: We identified incident IBD cases in Ontario, Canada between 1999 and 2008 and categorized subjects by age at diagnosis as young (18-40 yr), middle-age (41-64 yr), and elderly (≥65 yr). We compared IBD-specific health utilization indicators, including outpatient visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Results: The elderly accounted for 8.1% (N 725) and 11.6% (N 1749) of incident Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), respectively. They were less likely than young adults to have any IBD-specific gastroenterology visit in the first year after diagnosis (CD, 63% versus 71%, P <0.001; UC, 63% versus 69%, P <0.001). They less frequently received continuous gastroenterology care (CD, 36% versus 46%, P <0.001; UC, 33% versus 43%, P <0.001). Elderly patients with IBD were less likely than young adults to require an IBD-specific emergency department visit in the first year (CD, 8.8% versus 18.5%, P <0.001; UC, 7.8% versus 11.6%, P <0.001). Similarly, elderly patients with CD exhibited lower hospitalization rates (incidence rate ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.65). Hospitalization rates were modestly higher among those elderly patients with UC compared with young adults during the first year (incidence rate ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.28), but this association reversed thereafter (incidence rate ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.57-0.71). Conclusions: Elderly patients with IBD exhibited lower IBD-specific health care utilization than young adults, which may reflect a multitude of factors including more benign disease and differential health care access.

AB - Background: There is an increasing burden of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among the elderly. We sought to characterize health care utilization of elderly onset IBD. Methods: We identified incident IBD cases in Ontario, Canada between 1999 and 2008 and categorized subjects by age at diagnosis as young (18-40 yr), middle-age (41-64 yr), and elderly (≥65 yr). We compared IBD-specific health utilization indicators, including outpatient visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Results: The elderly accounted for 8.1% (N 725) and 11.6% (N 1749) of incident Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), respectively. They were less likely than young adults to have any IBD-specific gastroenterology visit in the first year after diagnosis (CD, 63% versus 71%, P <0.001; UC, 63% versus 69%, P <0.001). They less frequently received continuous gastroenterology care (CD, 36% versus 46%, P <0.001; UC, 33% versus 43%, P <0.001). Elderly patients with IBD were less likely than young adults to require an IBD-specific emergency department visit in the first year (CD, 8.8% versus 18.5%, P <0.001; UC, 7.8% versus 11.6%, P <0.001). Similarly, elderly patients with CD exhibited lower hospitalization rates (incidence rate ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.65). Hospitalization rates were modestly higher among those elderly patients with UC compared with young adults during the first year (incidence rate ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.28), but this association reversed thereafter (incidence rate ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.57-0.71). Conclusions: Elderly patients with IBD exhibited lower IBD-specific health care utilization than young adults, which may reflect a multitude of factors including more benign disease and differential health care access.

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