Health Care Providers in War and Armed Conflict: Operational and Educational Challenges in International Humanitarian Law and the Geneva Conventions, Part II. Educational and Training Initiatives

Frederick M. Burkle, Adam L. Kushner, Christos Giannou, Mary A. Paterson, Sherry M. Wren, Gilbert Burnham

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

No discipline has been impacted more by war and armed conflict than health care has. Health systems and health care providers are often the first victims, suffering increasingly heinous acts that cripple the essential health delivery and public health infrastructure necessary for the protection of civilian and military victims of the state at war. This commentary argues that current instructional opportunities to prepare health care providers fall short in both content and preparation, especially in those operational skill sets necessary to manage multiple challenges, threats, and violations under international humanitarian law and to perform triage management in a resource-poor medical setting. Utilizing a historical framework, the commentary addresses the transformation of the education and training of humanitarian health professionals from the Cold War to today followed by recommendations for the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-396
Number of pages14
JournalDisaster medicine and public health preparedness
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Keywords

  • Geneva Convention
  • International Committee of the Red Cross
  • complex humanitarian emergencies
  • international humanitarian law
  • war and armed conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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