Health Care Disparities in Race-Ethnic Minority Communities and Populations: Does the Availability of Health Care Providers Play a Role?

Kitty S. Chan, Megha A. Parikh, Roland J. Thorpe, Darrell J. Gaskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To examine disparities in use and access to different health care providers by community and individual race-ethnicity and to test provider supply as a potential mediator. Data Sources: National secondary data from 2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 5-year estimates (2010–2014) from American Community Survey, and 2014 InfoUSA. Study Design: Multiple logistic regression models examined the association of community and individual race-ethnicity with reported health care visits and access. Mediation analyses tested the role of provider supply. Data Extraction Methods: Individual-level survey data were linked to race-ethnic composition and health business counts of the respondent’s primary care service area (PCSA). Principal Findings: Minority PCSAs are significantly and independently associated with lower odds of having a visit to a physician assistant/nurse practitioner, dentist, or other health professionals and having a usual care provider (all p < 0.05). Few significant associations were observed for integrated PCSAs or for health provider supply. A modest mediation effect for provider supply was observed for travel time to usual care provider and visit to other health professionals. Conclusions: Use of a range of health services is lower in minority communities and individuals. However, provider supply was not an important explanatory factor of these disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Healthcare Disparities
Health Personnel
national minority
health care
supply
Health
Population
community
Logistic Models
health professionals
mediation
Physician Assistants
ethnicity
Health Services Accessibility
Nurse Practitioners
minority
Information Storage and Retrieval
Health Expenditures
Dentists
dentist

Keywords

  • Ethnic
  • Health care disparities
  • Health care provider supply
  • Racial
  • Segregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Health Care Disparities in Race-Ethnic Minority Communities and Populations: Does the Availability of Health Care Providers Play a Role?",
abstract = "Objectives: To examine disparities in use and access to different health care providers by community and individual race-ethnicity and to test provider supply as a potential mediator. Data Sources: National secondary data from 2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 5-year estimates (2010–2014) from American Community Survey, and 2014 InfoUSA. Study Design: Multiple logistic regression models examined the association of community and individual race-ethnicity with reported health care visits and access. Mediation analyses tested the role of provider supply. Data Extraction Methods: Individual-level survey data were linked to race-ethnic composition and health business counts of the respondent’s primary care service area (PCSA). Principal Findings: Minority PCSAs are significantly and independently associated with lower odds of having a visit to a physician assistant/nurse practitioner, dentist, or other health professionals and having a usual care provider (all p < 0.05). Few significant associations were observed for integrated PCSAs or for health provider supply. A modest mediation effect for provider supply was observed for travel time to usual care provider and visit to other health professionals. Conclusions: Use of a range of health services is lower in minority communities and individuals. However, provider supply was not an important explanatory factor of these disparities.",
keywords = "Ethnic, Health care disparities, Health care provider supply, Racial, Segregation",
author = "Chan, {Kitty S.} and Parikh, {Megha A.} and Thorpe, {Roland J.} and Gaskin, {Darrell J.}",
year = "2019",
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AU - Parikh, Megha A.

AU - Thorpe, Roland J.

AU - Gaskin, Darrell J.

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