Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients

C. Daniel Mullins, Fadia T. Shaya, Louis R. Flowers, Elijah Saunders, Wallace Johnson, Winston Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is one of the most frequently diagnosed chronic medical conditions in the United States and imposes a substantial financial and social burden on Americans. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the cost of health care resources for hypertensive patients taking analgesics stratified by having controlled versus uncontrolled hypertension. Methods: This was a retrospective, database analysis of data for managed-care patients in Maryland and Washington, DC, recorded from February 1, 1999, to July 31, 2001. Hypertensive patients who were taking analgesics were stratified by their hypertension control status using a claims-based algorithm. Annualized costs and differences in annualized costs calculated for the periods before and after the initiation of analgesics were compared by patient hypertension control status. Results: Of the 9805 patients in the study (mean [SD] age, 49.8 [12.04] years), 2523 (25.73%) were categorized as having uncontrolled hypertension. The mean total annualized costs differed significantly between the controlled and uncontrolled hypertension groups by $2568 (P <0.001). The annualized costs for emergency-department visits and hospitalizations for uncontrolled hypertensive patients exceeded those for controlled hypertensive patients by 9.3% and 28.0%, respectively. The differences between the postindex- and preindex-period costs for health care resources were $1972 with controlled hypertension and $2961 with uncontrolled hypertension (P <0.001). The results of linear regression, after adjustments were made for preindex costs and other covariates, indicated that patients with uncontrolled hypertension had significantly increased billed annualized costs (P <0.001). Conclusions: These data suggest that the costs of health care resources were significantly higher for analgesic users with uncontrolled hypertension than for analgesic users with controlled hypertension. A considerable proportion of the cost differential was directly attributable to hypertension-related treatment care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-293
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Therapeutics
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Care Costs
Analgesics
Hypertension
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Resources
Managed Care Programs
Hospital Emergency Service
Linear Models
Hospitalization
Databases

Keywords

  • Analgesics
  • Costs
  • Hypertension
  • Managed care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Mullins, C. D., Shaya, F. T., Flowers, L. R., Saunders, E., Johnson, W., & Wong, W. (2004). Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients. Clinical Therapeutics, 26(2), 285-293. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0149-2918(04)90027-6

Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients. / Mullins, C. Daniel; Shaya, Fadia T.; Flowers, Louis R.; Saunders, Elijah; Johnson, Wallace; Wong, Winston.

In: Clinical Therapeutics, Vol. 26, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 285-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mullins, CD, Shaya, FT, Flowers, LR, Saunders, E, Johnson, W & Wong, W 2004, 'Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients', Clinical Therapeutics, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 285-293. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0149-2918(04)90027-6
Mullins CD, Shaya FT, Flowers LR, Saunders E, Johnson W, Wong W. Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients. Clinical Therapeutics. 2004 Feb;26(2):285-293. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0149-2918(04)90027-6
Mullins, C. Daniel ; Shaya, Fadia T. ; Flowers, Louis R. ; Saunders, Elijah ; Johnson, Wallace ; Wong, Winston. / Health care cost of analgesic use in hypertensive patients. In: Clinical Therapeutics. 2004 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 285-293.
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