Health care access, health care utilisation and sexual orientation disclosure among Black sexual minority men in the Deep South

Ying He, Derek T. Dangerfield, Errol L. Fields, Milton R. Dawkins, Rodman E. Turpin, Damon Johnson, Dorothy C. Browne, Demarc A. Hickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Black gay, bisexual, and other sexual minority men (BSMM) account for 39.1% of new HIV infections among men who have sex with men and 78.9% of newly diagnosed cases among Black men. Health care access, health care utilisation and disclosing sexuality to providers are important factors in HIV prevention and treatment. This study explored the associations among sexual orientation disclosure, health care access and health care utilisation among BSMM in the Deep South. Methods:Secondary analysis of existing data of a population-based study in Jackson, Mississippi, and Atlanta, Georgia, was conducted among 386 BSMM. Poisson regression models were used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) between sexual orientation disclosure to healthcare providers, health care access and health care utilisation. Results:The mean (±s.d.) age of participants was 30.5 ± 11.2 years; 35.3% were previously diagnosed with HIV and 3.7% were newly diagnosed with HIV. Two-thirds (67.2%) self-identified as homosexual or gay; 70.6% reported being very open about their sexual orientation with their healthcare providers. After adjustment, BSMM who were not open about their sexual orientation had a lower prevalence of visiting a healthcare provider in the previous 12 months than those who were very open with their healthcare provider (PR 0.42; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.97). Conclusion:Clinics, hospitals and other healthcare settings should promote affirming environments that support sexuality disclosure for BSMM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-428
Number of pages8
JournalSexual Health
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Keywords

  • HIV
  • sexual health
  • sexually transmissible infection (STI)
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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