Health and school outcomes during children's transition into adolescence

Christopher B. Forrest, Katherine B. Bevans, Anne W Riley, Richard Crespo, Thomas Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Normative biopsychosocial stressors that occur during entry into adolescence can affect school performance. As a set of resources for adapting to life's challenges, good health may buffer a child from these potentially harmful stressors. This study examined the associations between health (measured as well-being, functioning, symptoms, and chronic conditions) and school outcomes among children aged 9-13 years in 4th-8th grades. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1,479 children from 34 schools followed from 2006 to 2008. Survey data were obtained from children and their parents, and school records were abstracted. Measures of child self-reported health were dichotomized to indicate presence of a health asset. Outcomes included attendance, grade point average, state achievement test scores, and child-reported school engagement and teacher connectedness. Results: Both the transition into middle school and puberty had independent negative influences on school outcomes. Chronic health conditions that affected children's functional status were associated with poorer academic achievement. The number of health assets that a child possessed was positively associated with school outcomes. Low levels of negative stress experiences and high physical comfort had positive effects on teacher connectedness, school engagement, and academic achievement, whereas bullying and bully victimization negatively affected these outcomes. Children with high life satisfaction were more connected with teachers, more engaged in schoolwork, and earned higher grades than those who were less satisfied. Conclusions: As children enter adolescence, good health may buffer them from the potentially negative effects of school and pubertal transitions on academic success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-194
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

School Health Services
Health
Bullying
Buffers
Crime Victims
Puberty
Cohort Studies
Parents
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Adolescence
  • Bullying
  • Children with special health care needs
  • Health
  • Middle childhood
  • School performance
  • Student engagement
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Health and school outcomes during children's transition into adolescence. / Forrest, Christopher B.; Bevans, Katherine B.; Riley, Anne W; Crespo, Richard; Louis, Thomas.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 52, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 186-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forrest, Christopher B. ; Bevans, Katherine B. ; Riley, Anne W ; Crespo, Richard ; Louis, Thomas. / Health and school outcomes during children's transition into adolescence. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 186-194.
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