HCV infection and cryptogenic cirrhosis are risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma among Latinos in New York City

Rafael Guerrero-Preston, Abby Siegel, John Renz, David Vlahov, Alfred Neugut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Latinos in the US experience a 60% higher death rate from primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when compared to Non-Latinos. The goal of this study was to examine risk factors that are associated with ethnic disparities among HCC patients seen at the transplant center of a metropolitan medical center in New York City. We compared HCC risk factors in 140 Non-Latino and 55 Latino patients that presented with HCC from 1995 to 2003. Surnames were used to define Latino and Non-Latino HCC patients in a retrospective analysis. Latino and Non-Latino HCC patients did not vary by gender or age at presentation (mean Latino age 60.8). Latino HCC patients had a higher frequency of presentation with advanced disease, defined as patients with unresectable HCC, than non Latino HCC patients (Latino 52.7%; 95% CI 39.1-66.3 vs. Non-Latino vs. 36.4%; 95% CI 28.3-44.4). Latinos were more likely than Non Latinos to have underlying HCV (34.5 vs. 22.1%, P < .0001; adjusted odds ratio [Siegel, 2008 #564], 3.69; 95% CI, 1.16-11.7) and cryptogenic liver diseases (7.2 vs. 3.5%, P < .0001; OR 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-65.0) after adjusting for age, gender and alfa-fetoprotein levels. Although more advanced disease may signal delay in access to care or more aggressive disease, HCV infection and cryptogenic cirrhosis at presentation are likely key factors for the greater burden of HCC among Latinos in New York City.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-505
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Keywords

  • Ethnic disparities
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Latinos
  • Minority elders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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