Have You Talked about It: Advance Care Planning among African Americans Living with HIV in Baltimore

Allysha C. Maragh-Bass, Yiqing Zhao, Sarina R. Isenberg, Mary M Mitchell, Amy R. Knowlton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Advance care planning (ACP) is the process of planning for when individuals are unable to make their own healthcare decisions. Research suggests ACP is understudied among HIV-positive African Americans. We explored ACP knowledge, preferences, and practices with HIV-positive African Americans from an urban HIV-specialty clinic (AFFIRM study). Participants completed surveys and interviews. Descriptive analyses and Poisson regression were conducted on survey data. Qualitative interviews were coded using grounded theory/constant comparative method. Participants were mostly male (55.1%). Half rated their current pain as at least six out of ten (50.8%). Two-thirds had discussed ACP with providers or supporters (66.2%). Qualitative themes were: (1) impact of managing pain on quality of life and healthcare, (2) knowledge/preferences for ACP, and (3) sources of HIV supportive care and coping (N = 39). Correlates of having discussed ACP included: moderate pain intensity (p < 0.10), including supporters in health decisions (p < 0.001), religious attendance (p < 0.05), and knowledge of healthcare mandates (p < 0.01; N = 276). Findings highlight the need for patient education to document healthcare preferences and communication skills development to promote inclusion of caregivers in decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Urban Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 30 2017

Keywords

  • Advance care planning
  • African Americans
  • DNR
  • End-of-life care
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Mixed methods
  • Quality of life
  • Urban health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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