Has job stability declined yet? New evidence for the 1990s

David Neumark, Daniel E. Polsky, Daniel Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We update the evidence on changes in job stability through the mid-1990s, using recently released Current Population Survey data for 1995 that parallel earlier job tenure supplements. In the aggregate, job stability declined modestly in the first half of the 1990s. Moreover, the relatively small aggregate changes mask rather sharp declines in stability for workers with more than a few years of tenure. Nonetheless, the data available to this point do not support the conclusion that the downward shift in job stability for more tenured workers, and the more modest decline in aggregate job stability, reflect long-term trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Labor Economics
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Workers
Tenure
Survey data
Current population survey
Job tenure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Has job stability declined yet? New evidence for the 1990s. / Neumark, David; Polsky, Daniel E.; Hansen, Daniel.

In: Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.10.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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