Hand preference in homosexual men

P. Satz, E. N. Miller, O. Selnes, W. Van Gorp, L. F. D'Elia, B. Visscher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study examined the distribution of hand preference and its relationship to immune system functioning and performance on neuropsychological tests in a sample of 993 homosexual men from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study comprising 502 HIV-1 seronegatives, 436 asymptomatic HIV-1 seropositives, and 55 men with diagnoses of AIDS or AIDS Related Complex. The prevalence of left-handedness in all of the groups (13.1-14.5%) was consistent with prior published reports of prevalent left-handedness in the general population. The distribution of hand preference scores (on a 5-item self-report questionnaire) was J-shaped and shifted to the right as in the general population. There were no differences between right- and left-handers in the immune system parameter of CD4 counts, nor was there any increase of self-reported allergies among the left-handers. We found a significantly larger number of 'outliers' on the neuropsychological measures for left-handers than for right-handers, both for HIV-1 seronegatives and seropositives. These results failed to replicate Lindesay's (1987) report of a leftward shift in manual preference among homosexual men, and failed to support Geschwind and Galaburda's (1985b) hypothesis of a link between homosexuality, handedness and autoimmune disorder. The differences between right- and left-handers on neuropsychological measures, independent of HIV-1 serostatus, are discussed in terms of Satz's (1972) model of pathological left-handedness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-306
Number of pages12
JournalCortex
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991

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Functional Laterality
HIV-1
Hand
Immune System
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS-Related Complex
Neuropsychological Tests
Homosexuality
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Self Report
Population
Hypersensitivity
Cohort Studies
Sexual Minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Satz, P., Miller, E. N., Selnes, O., Van Gorp, W., D'Elia, L. F., & Visscher, B. (1991). Hand preference in homosexual men. Cortex, 27(2), 295-306.

Hand preference in homosexual men. / Satz, P.; Miller, E. N.; Selnes, O.; Van Gorp, W.; D'Elia, L. F.; Visscher, B.

In: Cortex, Vol. 27, No. 2, 1991, p. 295-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satz, P, Miller, EN, Selnes, O, Van Gorp, W, D'Elia, LF & Visscher, B 1991, 'Hand preference in homosexual men', Cortex, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 295-306.
Satz P, Miller EN, Selnes O, Van Gorp W, D'Elia LF, Visscher B. Hand preference in homosexual men. Cortex. 1991;27(2):295-306.
Satz, P. ; Miller, E. N. ; Selnes, O. ; Van Gorp, W. ; D'Elia, L. F. ; Visscher, B. / Hand preference in homosexual men. In: Cortex. 1991 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 295-306.
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