Hair nicotine levels in children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Michael Collaco, Angela D. Aherrera, Patrick N Breysse, Jonathan P. Winickoff, Jonathan D. Klein, Sharon A McGrath-Morrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) may increase respiratory morbidities in young children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Rapid respiratory rates, close proximity to a smoking caregiver, and increased dermal absorption of tobacco smoke components can contribute to systemic exposure. In this study, hair nicotine levels were used as a biomarker of chronic TSE in young children with BPD to determine if hair nicotine levels correlate with caregiver self-report of TSE and respiratory morbidities. METHODS: From 2012 to 2014, hair nicotine levels were measured from consecutive children seen in a BPD outpatient clinic and compared with caregiver questionnaires on household smoking. The relationship between respiratory morbidities and self-reported TSE or hair nicotine level was assessed. RESULTS: The mean hair nicotine level from 117 children was 3.1 ± 13.2 ng/mg. Hair nicotine levels were significantly higher in children from smoking households by caregiver self-report compared with caregivers who reported no smoking (8.2 ± 19.7 ng/mg vs 1.8 ± 10.7; P <.001). In households that reported smoking, hair nicotine levels were higher in children with a primary caregiver who smoked compared with a primary caregiver who did not smoke. Among children with BPD who required respiratory support (n = 50), a significant association was found between higher log hair nicotine levels and increased hospitalizations and limitation of activity. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic TSE is common in children with BPD, with hair nicotine levels being more likely to detect TSE than caregiver self-report. Hair nicotine levels were also a better predictor of hospitalization and activity limitation in children with BPD who required respiratory support at outpatient presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e678-e686
JournalPediatrics
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Nicotine
Hair
Smoke
Caregivers
Tobacco
Smoking
Self Report
Morbidity
Hospitalization
Skin Absorption
Respiratory Rate
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Outpatients
Biomarkers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hair nicotine levels in children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. / Collaco, Michael; Aherrera, Angela D.; Breysse, Patrick N; Winickoff, Jonathan P.; Klein, Jonathan D.; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 135, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. e678-e686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Collaco, Michael ; Aherrera, Angela D. ; Breysse, Patrick N ; Winickoff, Jonathan P. ; Klein, Jonathan D. ; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A. / Hair nicotine levels in children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 135, No. 3. pp. e678-e686.
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