Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine

Youngseok Lee, Min Jung Kang, Jaewon Shim, Chae Uk Cheong, Seok Jun Moon, Craig Montell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Insect survival depends on contact chemosensation to sense and avoid consuming plant-derived insecticides, such as L-canavanine. Members of a family of ~60 gustatory receptors (GRs) comprise the main peripheral receptors responsible for taste sensation in Drosophila. However, the roles of most Drosophila GRs are unknown. In addition to GRs, a G protein-coupled receptor, DmXR, has been reported to be required for detecting L-canavanine. Here, we showed that GRs are essential for responding to L-canavanine and that flies missing DmXR displayed normal L-canavanine avoidance and L-canavanine-evoked action potentials. Mutations disrupting either Gr8a or Gr66a resulted in an inability to detect L-canavanine.Wefound that L-canavanine stimulated action potentials in S-type sensilla, which were where Gr8a and Gr66a were both expressed, but not in Gr66a-expressing sensilla that did not express Gr8a. L-canavanine-induced action potentials were also abolished in the Gr8a and Gr66a mutant animals. Gr8a was narrowly required for responding to L-canavanine, in contrast to Gr66a, which was broadly required for responding to other noxious tastants. Our data suggest that GR8a and GR66a are subunits of an L-canavanine receptor and that GR8a contributes to the specificity for L-canavanine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1429-1435
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 25 2012

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Canavanine
Insecticides
Action Potentials
Sensilla
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Evoked Potentials
Diptera
Drosophila
Insects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Lee, Y., Kang, M. J., Shim, J., Cheong, C. U., Moon, S. J., & Montell, C. (2012). Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(4), 1429-1435. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4630-11.2012

Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine. / Lee, Youngseok; Kang, Min Jung; Shim, Jaewon; Cheong, Chae Uk; Moon, Seok Jun; Montell, Craig.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 32, No. 4, 25.01.2012, p. 1429-1435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Y, Kang, MJ, Shim, J, Cheong, CU, Moon, SJ & Montell, C 2012, 'Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 1429-1435. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4630-11.2012
Lee, Youngseok ; Kang, Min Jung ; Shim, Jaewon ; Cheong, Chae Uk ; Moon, Seok Jun ; Montell, Craig. / Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 1429-1435.
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