Guidelines to Aid in the Distinction of Endometrial and Endocervical Carcinomas, and the Distinction of Independent Primary Carcinomas of the Endometrium and Adnexa from Metastatic Spread between These and Other Sites

Colin J.R. Stewart, Christopher P. Crum, W. Glenn McCluggage, Kay J. Park, Joanne K. Rutgers, Esther Oliva, Anais Malpica, Vinita Parkash, Xavier Matias-Guiu, Brigitte M. Ronnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In most cases of suspected endometrial neoplasia tumor origin can be correctly assigned according to a combination of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features, even when the latter are based upon the examination of relatively small biopsy samples. However there are well-recognized exceptions to this rule which continue to create diagnostic difficulty, and sometimes difficulties persist even after the detailed examination of resection specimens. Among the most common problems encountered in practice are the distinction of primary endometrial and primary endocervical adenocarcinomas, and the determination of tumor origin when there is synchronous, multifocal involvement of gynecologic tract sites, for example the endometrium and the ovary. However, accurate diagnosis in these cases is important because this has significant staging, management and prognostic implications. In this review we discuss the value and limitations of key morphologic, immunophenotypic and molecular findings in these diagnostic scenarios.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S75-S92
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Pathology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Carcinoma
  • Distinction
  • Endocervical
  • Endometrial
  • Independent
  • Metastasis
  • Ovary
  • Synchronous

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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