Growth tracking of femoral and humeral strength from infancy through late adolescence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To determine to what degree femoral and humeral strengths "track", or remain at the same ranked position relative to other individuals during the entire growth period. Methods: Radiographs of 20 individuals, equally divided by sex, were measured at 6-mo or annual intervals from 6 mo to 17 y of age. The section modulus, a measure of bending/torsional strength, was derived from cortical and subperiosteal breadths taken at the femoral midshaft and at 40% of the bone length from the distal end of the humerus. Body size was also assessed as the product of body weight and bone length. Growth tracking was evaluated in two ways: as Spearman rank-order correlations between strengths at each age point and strengths at 17 y of age, and as the number of individual changes in rank over specified age intervals. All analyses were carried out within sex. Results: The degree of growth tracking varied by sex, skeletal location, and age. Correlations were higher for the humerus (r = 0.56-0.83) than for the femur (r = 0.10-0.63). Males showed particularly poor tracking for the femur, most likely due to late and variable adolescent growth spurts in body size. Standardizing for body size improved tracking for the male femur, but not for the humerus. Over the entire growth period, individuals averaged 5-8 out of a possible 9 changes in rank. Early childhood (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1030-1037
Number of pages8
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume94
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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Thigh
Humerus
Body Size
Femur
Growth
Bone and Bones
Body Weight

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Body size
  • Bone strength
  • Children
  • Growth tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Aim: To determine to what degree femoral and humeral strengths {"}track{"}, or remain at the same ranked position relative to other individuals during the entire growth period. Methods: Radiographs of 20 individuals, equally divided by sex, were measured at 6-mo or annual intervals from 6 mo to 17 y of age. The section modulus, a measure of bending/torsional strength, was derived from cortical and subperiosteal breadths taken at the femoral midshaft and at 40{\%} of the bone length from the distal end of the humerus. Body size was also assessed as the product of body weight and bone length. Growth tracking was evaluated in two ways: as Spearman rank-order correlations between strengths at each age point and strengths at 17 y of age, and as the number of individual changes in rank over specified age intervals. All analyses were carried out within sex. Results: The degree of growth tracking varied by sex, skeletal location, and age. Correlations were higher for the humerus (r = 0.56-0.83) than for the femur (r = 0.10-0.63). Males showed particularly poor tracking for the femur, most likely due to late and variable adolescent growth spurts in body size. Standardizing for body size improved tracking for the male femur, but not for the humerus. Over the entire growth period, individuals averaged 5-8 out of a possible 9 changes in rank. Early childhood (",
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