Growth suppression of human breast cancer cells by the introduction of a wild-type p53 gene

G. Casey, M. Lo-Hsueh, M. E. Lopez, B. Vogelstein, E. J. Stanbridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mutations in the p53 gene are associated with a wide variety of human tumors, including those of the breast. To assess functionally the role of the p53 gene in the development of human breast cancer, we introduced either wild-type or mutant p53 cDNA into three human breast cancer cell lines by DNA transfection. The cell lines MDA-MB 468 and T47 D contain only single mutated copies of the p53 gene, whereas the status of p53 in the breast cancer cell line MCF 7 remains equivocal. Following transfection, MCF 7 cells continued to grow unaffected both in vitro and in vivo in the presence of high levels of expression of the exogenous wild-type p53 gene. In contrast, however, the continued expression of an exogenous wild-type p53 gene was incompatible with cellular growth in both the MDA-MB 468 and T47 D cell lines. Elevated levels of expression of the exogenous mutant p53 gene did not alter the growth of the cell lines in vitro. These data strongly suggest that the wild-type p53 gene can function as a suppressor of cellular growth in breast cancer cells. That the wild-type p53 gene does not suppress the growth of MCF 7 cells indicates that at least some human breast tumors can arise without functional inactivation of the p53 gene by mutation. These tumors may represent a separate prognostic group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1791-1797
Number of pages7
JournalOncogene
Volume6
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 7 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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    Casey, G., Lo-Hsueh, M., Lopez, M. E., Vogelstein, B., & Stanbridge, E. J. (1991). Growth suppression of human breast cancer cells by the introduction of a wild-type p53 gene. Oncogene, 6(10), 1791-1797.