Growth slowing after acute Helicobacter pylori infection is age-dependent

Douglas J. Passaro, David N. Taylor, Robert H Gilman, Lilia Cabrera, Julie Parsonnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Most Helicobacter pylori infections occur during childhood, but the health effects of childhood infection are poorly understood. We investigated whether growth decreases in the 2 months after acute H. pylori seroconversion. Methods: We performed a nested case-control study among children 6 months to 12 years of age in a community on the outskirts of Lima, Peru. Health interviews were completed daily. Anthropometric measurements were taken monthly. Sera were collected every 4 months and tested for H. pylori immunoglobulin G. Two-month height and weight gains of seroconverters were compared with gains of sex, age, and size-matched seronegative controls. Results: In the 2 months after H. pylori infection, 26 seroconverters gained a median of 24% less weight than 26 matched controls (interquartile range, 63% less to 21% more). In multivariate analysis, H. pylori infection attenuated weight gain only among children aged 2 years or older. This decrease was not explained by increased diarrhea. Conclusions: H. pylori seroconversion is associated with a slowing of weight gain in children aged 2 years or older. Reasons for this finding merit additional study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-526
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Helicobacter pylori
Helicobacter Infections
Growth
infection
Weight Gain
weight gain
seroconversion
childhood
Peru
immunoglobulin G
Health
anthropometric measurements
case-control studies
multivariate analysis
Case-Control Studies
Diarrhea
interviews
diarrhea
Multivariate Analysis
Immunoglobulin G

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Histology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Growth slowing after acute Helicobacter pylori infection is age-dependent. / Passaro, Douglas J.; Taylor, David N.; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrera, Lilia; Parsonnet, Julie.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Vol. 35, No. 4, 02.10.2002, p. 522-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Passaro, Douglas J. ; Taylor, David N. ; Gilman, Robert H ; Cabrera, Lilia ; Parsonnet, Julie. / Growth slowing after acute Helicobacter pylori infection is age-dependent. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2002 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 522-526.
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