Growth Hormone Secretagogue Treatment in Hypogonadal Men Raises Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels

John T. Sigalos, Alexander W. Pastuszak, Andrew Allison, Samuel J. Ohlander, Amin Herati, Mark C. Lindgren, Larry I. Lipshultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Realizing the reported misuse of human growth hormone (GH), investigation of a safe alternative mechanism for increasing endogenous GH is needed. Several GH secretagogues are available, including GH-releasing peptides (GHRPs) GHRP-2 and GHRP-6, and the GH-releasing hormone analog, sermorelin (SERM). Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) serves as a surrogate marker for GH. Here, the effect of GHRP/SERM therapy on IGF-1 levels is evaluated. A retrospective review of medical records was performed for 105 men on testosterone (T) therapy seeking increases in lean body mass and fat loss who were prescribed 100 mcg of GHRP-6, GHRP-2, and SERM three times daily. Compliance with therapy was assessed, and 14 men met strict inclusion criteria. Serum hormone levels of IGF-1, T, free T (FT), estradiol (E), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were evaluated. Mean (SD) age of the cohort was 33.2 (2.9) years, and baseline IGF-1 level was 159.5 (26.7) ng/mL. Mean (SD) duration of continuous GHRP/SERM treatment was 134 (88) days. Mean posttreatment IGF-1 level was 239.0 (54.6) ng/mL (p <.0001). Three of the 14 men were on an aromatase inhibitor and/or tamoxifen prior to treatment and another 4 men were coadministered an aromatase inhibitor and/or tamoxifen during treatment. Inhibition of E production or estrogen receptor blockade resulted in smaller increases in IGF-1 levels. GHRP/SERM therapy increases serum IGF-1 levels with strict compliance to thrice-daily dosing. The results suggest that combination therapy may be beneficial in men with wasting conditions that can improve with increased GH secretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1752-1757
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Sermorelin
Somatomedins
Growth Hormone
Serum
Peptides
Aromatase Inhibitors
Tamoxifen
Therapeutics
Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone
Human Growth Hormone
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Luteinizing Hormone
Estrogen Receptors
Medical Records
Testosterone
Estradiol
Biomarkers
Fats
Hormones

Keywords

  • growth hormone
  • growth hormone secretagogue
  • growth hormone–releasing peptides
  • hypogonadism
  • IGF-1 levels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sigalos, J. T., Pastuszak, A. W., Allison, A., Ohlander, S. J., Herati, A., Lindgren, M. C., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2017). Growth Hormone Secretagogue Treatment in Hypogonadal Men Raises Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels. American Journal of Men's Health, 11(6), 1752-1757. https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988317718662

Growth Hormone Secretagogue Treatment in Hypogonadal Men Raises Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels. / Sigalos, John T.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Allison, Andrew; Ohlander, Samuel J.; Herati, Amin; Lindgren, Mark C.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

In: American Journal of Men's Health, Vol. 11, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 1752-1757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sigalos, JT, Pastuszak, AW, Allison, A, Ohlander, SJ, Herati, A, Lindgren, MC & Lipshultz, LI 2017, 'Growth Hormone Secretagogue Treatment in Hypogonadal Men Raises Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels', American Journal of Men's Health, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 1752-1757. https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988317718662
Sigalos, John T. ; Pastuszak, Alexander W. ; Allison, Andrew ; Ohlander, Samuel J. ; Herati, Amin ; Lindgren, Mark C. ; Lipshultz, Larry I. / Growth Hormone Secretagogue Treatment in Hypogonadal Men Raises Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels. In: American Journal of Men's Health. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 1752-1757.
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