Group M-based HIV-1 Gag peptides are frequently targeted by T cells in chronically infected US and Zambian patients

Anju Bansal, Ethan Gough, Doug Ritter, Craig Wilson, Joseph Mulenga, Susan Allen, Paul A. Goepfert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The enormous sequence diversity of HIV-1 has been a major obstacle in the development of a globally useful vaccine for AIDS. The consensus and ancestral sequence-based immunogens minimize the genetic distance between contemporary isolates and vaccine strains. Hence these sequences may be promising candidates for HIV vaccines or serve as a universal reagent set for evaluating Gag-specific responses. Methods: In this study, we measured the T-cell reactivity to consensus (subtype A, B, C and group M), ancestral (group M and subtype B) and HXB2 Gag peptides (15-mers overlapping by 11) in HIV-1-infected subjects from two reference populations. We evaluated the Gag-specific T-cell responses in 43 chronically infected US (subtype B) and 13 Zambian (subtype C) subjects using an interferon-γ enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent spot assay. Results: Our findings demonstrate a broad cross-reactivity of nearly 70% among all the seven Gag immunogens evaluated. Consensus M sequences elicited similar levels of responses as did the consensus B, ancestral subtype B and HXB2 peptides in subtype B-infected US patients. In subtype C-infected Zambian subjects, responses of similar breadth and magnitude were elicited by consensus C, consensus M and ancestral M peptides. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that peptide pools based on consensus or ancestral M-based sequences can be used to evaluate Gag-specific responses elicited by subtype B or subtype C-based immunogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-360
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

AIDS Vaccines
Consensus Sequence
HIV-1
T-Lymphocytes
Peptides
Interferons
Vaccines
Enzymes
Population
peptide B
retinal S antigen peptide M

Keywords

  • Ancestral
  • Consensus
  • Cross subtype recognition
  • Gag protein
  • HIV-1 sequence
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Group M-based HIV-1 Gag peptides are frequently targeted by T cells in chronically infected US and Zambian patients. / Bansal, Anju; Gough, Ethan; Ritter, Doug; Wilson, Craig; Mulenga, Joseph; Allen, Susan; Goepfert, Paul A.

In: AIDS, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.02.2006, p. 353-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bansal, Anju ; Gough, Ethan ; Ritter, Doug ; Wilson, Craig ; Mulenga, Joseph ; Allen, Susan ; Goepfert, Paul A. / Group M-based HIV-1 Gag peptides are frequently targeted by T cells in chronically infected US and Zambian patients. In: AIDS. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 353-360.
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