Greater household expenditures on fruits and vegetables but not animal source foods are associated with decreased risk of under-five child mortality among families in rural Indonesia

Ashley A. Campbell, Andrew Thorne-Lyman, Kai Sun, Saskia De Pee, Klaus Kraemer, Regina Moench-Pfanner, Mayang Sari, Nasima Akhter, Martin W. Bloem, Richard D. Semba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The specific aims of this study were to examine the relationships between household food expenditures and under-5 child mortality among families in rural Indonesia. Data collected between 2000 and 2003 in the Indonesia Nutrition and Health Surveillance System, a population-based surveillance system conducted in 7 rural provinces, were utilized for the analysis. Food expenditures were divided into 4 major categories: plant foods (fruits and vegetables), animal foods, other nongrain foods, and grain foods (primarily rice) and expressed as quintiles of proportional food expenditure. Of 292,894 households, 32,777 (11.2%) households reported a history of under-5 child mortality. Plant food expenditures were associated with reduced odds of under-5 child mortality [odds ratio (OR), 0.70; 95% CI, 0.67-0.73; P < 0.0001) among families in the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile, adjusting for potential confounders. Grain food expenditures were associated with increased odds of under-5 child mortality (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.20-1.30; P < 0.0001) among families in the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile, adjusting for potential confounders. Animal food expenditures were not consistently and significantly associated with under-5 child mortality across quintiles of expenditures. These findings suggest that lower under-5 child mortality is found in households that spend a greater proportion of income on plant foods and less on grain foods in rural Indonesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2244-2249
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume138
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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