Greater acculturation is associated with poorer cardiovascular health in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

Olatokunbo Osibogun, Oluseye Ogunmoroti, Lena Mathews, Victor Okunrintemi, Martin Tibuakuu, Erin D. Michos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Greater acculturation is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the association between acculturation and ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) as measured by the American Heart Association’s 7 CVH metrics. We investigated the association between acculturation and ideal CVH among a multi-ethnic cohort of US adults free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a cross-sectional analysis of 6506 men and women aged 45 to 84 years of 4 races/eth-nicities. We examined measures of acculturation(birthplace, language spoken at home, and years lived in the United States [foreign-born participants]) by CVH score. Scores of 0 to 8 indicate inadequate, 9 to 10 average and 11 to 14 optimal CVH. We used multivariable regression to examine associations between acculturation and CVH, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income and health insurance. The mean (SD) age was 62 (10) years, 53% were women, 39% non-Hispanic White-, 26% non-Hispanic Black-, 12% Chinese-and 22% Hispanic-Americans. US-born participants had lower odds of optimal CVH (odds ratio [OR]: 0.63 [0.50– 0.79], P<0.001) compared with foreign-born participants. Participants who spoke Chinese and other foreign languages at home had greater odds of optimal CVH compared with those who spoke English (1.91 [1.08– 3.36], P=0.03; and 1.65 [1.04– 2.63], P=0.03, respectively). Foreign-born participants who lived the longest in the United States had lower odds of optimal CVH (0.62 [0.43– 0.91], P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Greater US acculturation was associated with poorer CVH. This finding suggests that the promotion of ideal CVH should be encouraged among immigrant populations since more years lived in the United States was associated with poorer CVH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere019828
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Ideal cardiovascular health metrics
  • Life’s Simple 7
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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