Graduate medical education: The policy debate

Gerard F Anderson, George D. Greenberg, Barbara O. Wynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cost of providing graduate medical education to the approximately 100,000 medical residents in the United States is approximately $18 billion. The government, primarily through the Medicare program, funds almost two thirds of the cost. Unfortunately, the federal government lacks a coherent policy with respect to what objectives it wants to achieve for this expenditure. This article traces (a) the evolution of graduate medical education funding; (b) current proposals to reform the funding mechanism; (c) how the Medicare program currently funds graduate medical education; (d) how funds are allocated to specific institutions; and (e) specific policy objectives that academic medical centers should be held accountable for achieving in return for receiving public funds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-47
Number of pages13
JournalAnnual Review of Public Health
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Graduate Medical Education
Financial Management
Medicare
Costs and Cost Analysis
Federal Government
Health Expenditures

Keywords

  • Academic medical centers
  • Medicare program
  • Physician supply
  • Residency training
  • Teaching hospitals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Graduate medical education : The policy debate. / Anderson, Gerard F; Greenberg, George D.; Wynn, Barbara O.

In: Annual Review of Public Health, Vol. 22, 2001, p. 35-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, Gerard F ; Greenberg, George D. ; Wynn, Barbara O. / Graduate medical education : The policy debate. In: Annual Review of Public Health. 2001 ; Vol. 22. pp. 35-47.
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