Gradual anisometric-isometric transition for human-machine interfaces

Tricia L. Gibo, Michele F. Rotella, Amy J. Bastian, Allison M. Okamura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are widely used in biomedical applications, from teleoperated surgical systems to rehabilitation devices. This paper investigates a method of control that allows an HMI to transition from anisometric to isometric mode, shifting the control input from position to force as the user's movement is gradually reduced. Two different approaches for achieving this transition are discussed: one is based on the natural system dynamics, whereas the other involves selecting and controlling dynamics. The two approaches were implemented on a custom haptic device in a targeting task. Anisometric to isometric transitioning can potentially be used for training purposes, enabling transfer of what was learned in one mode to the other, as well as novel studies of the human sensorimotor system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
Pages4507-4510
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 26 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2011Sep 3 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period8/30/119/3/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gradual anisometric-isometric transition for human-machine interfaces'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Gibo, T. L., Rotella, M. F., Bastian, A. J., & Okamura, A. M. (2011). Gradual anisometric-isometric transition for human-machine interfaces. In 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011 (pp. 4507-4510). [6091117] (Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS). https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2011.6091117