Glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-glucose abolishes both neuronal and network bursts in an in vitro seizure model

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Abstract

Neuronal activity is energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) on basal membrane properties, spontaneous neuronal firing, and epileptiform network bursts in hippocampal slices. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on basal membrane properties was examined in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which are not ordinarily active spontaneously. Intracellular application of 2-DG did not significantly alter the membrane input resistance, action-potential threshold, firing pattern, or input-output relationship of these neurons compared with simultaneously recorded neighboring neurons without intracellular 2-DG. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on neuronal firing was tested in spontaneously active hippocampal neurons (CA3) when synaptic transmission was left intact or blocked with AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptor antagonists (DNQX, APV, and bicuculline, respectively). Under both conditions (synaptic activity intact or blocked), bath application of 2-DG (2 mM) blocked spontaneous firing in ~2/3 (67 and 71%, respectively) of CA3 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, neuronal firing of CA3 neurons persisted when 2-DG was applied intracellularly, suggesting that glycolytic inhibition of individual neurons is not sufficient to stop neuronal firing. The effects of 2-DG on epileptiform network bursts in area CA3 were tested in Mg2+-free medium containing 50 μM 4-aminopyridine. Bath application of 2-DG abolished these epileptiform bursts in a dose-dependent and all-or-none manner. Taken together, these data suggest that altered glucose metabolism profoundly affects cellular and network hyperexcitability and that glycolytic inhibition by 2-DG can effectively abrogate epileptiform activity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neuronal activity is highly energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) effectively suppresses spontaneous neuronal firing and epileptiform bursts in hippocampal slices. These data suggest that an altered metabolic state can profoundly affect cellular and network excitability, and that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG may hold promise as a novel treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-113
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume118
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Deoxyglucose
Seizures
Neurons
Baths
Membranes
In Vitro Techniques
GABA-A Receptor Antagonists
4-Aminopyridine
AMPA Receptors
Bicuculline
Pyramidal Cells
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Synaptic Transmission
Action Potentials
Glucose

Keywords

  • Cellular excitability
  • Epilepsy
  • Glucose metabolism
  • Hippocampus
  • Patch clamp

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology

Cite this

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title = "Glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-glucose abolishes both neuronal and network bursts in an in vitro seizure model",
abstract = "Neuronal activity is energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) on basal membrane properties, spontaneous neuronal firing, and epileptiform network bursts in hippocampal slices. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on basal membrane properties was examined in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which are not ordinarily active spontaneously. Intracellular application of 2-DG did not significantly alter the membrane input resistance, action-potential threshold, firing pattern, or input-output relationship of these neurons compared with simultaneously recorded neighboring neurons without intracellular 2-DG. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on neuronal firing was tested in spontaneously active hippocampal neurons (CA3) when synaptic transmission was left intact or blocked with AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptor antagonists (DNQX, APV, and bicuculline, respectively). Under both conditions (synaptic activity intact or blocked), bath application of 2-DG (2 mM) blocked spontaneous firing in ~2/3 (67 and 71{\%}, respectively) of CA3 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, neuronal firing of CA3 neurons persisted when 2-DG was applied intracellularly, suggesting that glycolytic inhibition of individual neurons is not sufficient to stop neuronal firing. The effects of 2-DG on epileptiform network bursts in area CA3 were tested in Mg2+-free medium containing 50 μM 4-aminopyridine. Bath application of 2-DG abolished these epileptiform bursts in a dose-dependent and all-or-none manner. Taken together, these data suggest that altered glucose metabolism profoundly affects cellular and network hyperexcitability and that glycolytic inhibition by 2-DG can effectively abrogate epileptiform activity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neuronal activity is highly energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) effectively suppresses spontaneous neuronal firing and epileptiform bursts in hippocampal slices. These data suggest that an altered metabolic state can profoundly affect cellular and network excitability, and that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG may hold promise as a novel treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.",
keywords = "Cellular excitability, Epilepsy, Glucose metabolism, Hippocampus, Patch clamp",
author = "Lirong Shao and Carl Stafstrom",
year = "2017",
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T1 - Glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-glucose abolishes both neuronal and network bursts in an in vitro seizure model

AU - Shao, Lirong

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N2 - Neuronal activity is energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) on basal membrane properties, spontaneous neuronal firing, and epileptiform network bursts in hippocampal slices. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on basal membrane properties was examined in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which are not ordinarily active spontaneously. Intracellular application of 2-DG did not significantly alter the membrane input resistance, action-potential threshold, firing pattern, or input-output relationship of these neurons compared with simultaneously recorded neighboring neurons without intracellular 2-DG. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on neuronal firing was tested in spontaneously active hippocampal neurons (CA3) when synaptic transmission was left intact or blocked with AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptor antagonists (DNQX, APV, and bicuculline, respectively). Under both conditions (synaptic activity intact or blocked), bath application of 2-DG (2 mM) blocked spontaneous firing in ~2/3 (67 and 71%, respectively) of CA3 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, neuronal firing of CA3 neurons persisted when 2-DG was applied intracellularly, suggesting that glycolytic inhibition of individual neurons is not sufficient to stop neuronal firing. The effects of 2-DG on epileptiform network bursts in area CA3 were tested in Mg2+-free medium containing 50 μM 4-aminopyridine. Bath application of 2-DG abolished these epileptiform bursts in a dose-dependent and all-or-none manner. Taken together, these data suggest that altered glucose metabolism profoundly affects cellular and network hyperexcitability and that glycolytic inhibition by 2-DG can effectively abrogate epileptiform activity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neuronal activity is highly energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) effectively suppresses spontaneous neuronal firing and epileptiform bursts in hippocampal slices. These data suggest that an altered metabolic state can profoundly affect cellular and network excitability, and that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG may hold promise as a novel treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

AB - Neuronal activity is energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) on basal membrane properties, spontaneous neuronal firing, and epileptiform network bursts in hippocampal slices. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on basal membrane properties was examined in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which are not ordinarily active spontaneously. Intracellular application of 2-DG did not significantly alter the membrane input resistance, action-potential threshold, firing pattern, or input-output relationship of these neurons compared with simultaneously recorded neighboring neurons without intracellular 2-DG. The effect of glycolytic inhibition on neuronal firing was tested in spontaneously active hippocampal neurons (CA3) when synaptic transmission was left intact or blocked with AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptor antagonists (DNQX, APV, and bicuculline, respectively). Under both conditions (synaptic activity intact or blocked), bath application of 2-DG (2 mM) blocked spontaneous firing in ~2/3 (67 and 71%, respectively) of CA3 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, neuronal firing of CA3 neurons persisted when 2-DG was applied intracellularly, suggesting that glycolytic inhibition of individual neurons is not sufficient to stop neuronal firing. The effects of 2-DG on epileptiform network bursts in area CA3 were tested in Mg2+-free medium containing 50 μM 4-aminopyridine. Bath application of 2-DG abolished these epileptiform bursts in a dose-dependent and all-or-none manner. Taken together, these data suggest that altered glucose metabolism profoundly affects cellular and network hyperexcitability and that glycolytic inhibition by 2-DG can effectively abrogate epileptiform activity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neuronal activity is highly energy demanding and coupled to cellular metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that glycolytic inhibition with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) effectively suppresses spontaneous neuronal firing and epileptiform bursts in hippocampal slices. These data suggest that an altered metabolic state can profoundly affect cellular and network excitability, and that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG may hold promise as a novel treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

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