Glycemic Outcomes of Islet Autotransplantation

Mohammed E. Al-Sofiani, Michael Quartuccio, Erica Hall, Rita R. Kalyani

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: While there has been a growing utilization of total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) for patients with medically refractory chronic pancreatitis over the past few decades, there remains a lack of consensus clinical guidelines to inform the counseling and management of patients undergoing TPIAT. In this article, we review the current clinical practice and published experience of several TPIAT centers, outline key aspects in managing patients undergoing TPIAT, and discuss the glycemic outcomes of this procedure. Recent Findings: Aiming for lower inpatient glucose targets immediately after surgery (usually 100–120 mg/dl), maintaining all patients on subcutaneous insulin for at least 3 months to “rest” islets before an attempt is made to wean insulin, and close outpatient endocrinology follow-up after TPIAT particularly in the first year is common and related to better outcomes. Although TPIAT procedures and glycemic outcomes may differ across surgical centers, overall, approximately one third of patients are insulin independent at 1 year after TPIAT. Higher islet yield and lower preoperative glucose levels are among the strongest predictors of short-term post-operative insulin independence. Beyond 1 year post-operatively, the clinical management and long-term glycemic outcomes of patients after TPIAT are more variable. Summary: A multidisciplinary approach is essential in optimizing the preoperative, inpatient, and post-operative management and counseling of patients about the expected glycemic outcomes after surgery. Consensus guidelines for the clinical management of diabetes after TPIAT and harmonization of data collection protocols among TPIAT centers are needed to address the current knowledge gaps in clinical care and research and to optimize glycemic outcomes after TPIAT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pancreatectomy
Autologous Transplantation
Insulin
Counseling
Inpatients
Consensus
Guidelines
Glucose
Endocrinology
Chronic Pancreatitis
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Glycemic outcomes
  • Insulin independence
  • Islet autotransplantation
  • Total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Glycemic Outcomes of Islet Autotransplantation. / Al-Sofiani, Mohammed E.; Quartuccio, Michael; Hall, Erica; Kalyani, Rita R.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 18, No. 11, 116, 01.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Al-Sofiani, Mohammed E. ; Quartuccio, Michael ; Hall, Erica ; Kalyani, Rita R. / Glycemic Outcomes of Islet Autotransplantation. In: Current Diabetes Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 11.
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