Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations in Myanmar: G6PD Mahidol (487G>A) is the most common variant in the Myanmar population

Hiroyuki Matsuoka, Jichun Wang, Makoto Hirai, Meiji Arai, Shigeto Yoshida, Tamaki Kobayashi, Amadu Jalloh, Khin Lin, Fumihiko Kawamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We conducted a survey of malaria diagnoses and treatments in remote areas of Myanmar. Blood specimens from more than 1,000 people were collected by the finger-prick method, and 121 (11%) of these people were found to be glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient. Of these 121, 50 consented to analysis of the G6PD genome. We read the G6PD sequences of these subjects and found 45 cases of G6PD Mahidol (487G>A), two of G6PD Coimbra (592C>T), two of G6PD Union (1360C>T), and one of G6PD Canton (1376G>T). Taken together with data from our previous report, 91.3% (73/80) of G6PD variants were G6PD Mahidol. This finding suggests that the Myanmar population is derived from homogeneous ancestries and are different from Thai, Malaysian, and Indonesian populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-547
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Human Genetics
Volume49
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency
  • Mahidol
  • Malaria
  • Myanmar
  • Primaquine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations in Myanmar: G6PD Mahidol (487G>A) is the most common variant in the Myanmar population'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this