GluA1 phosphorylation contributes to postsynaptic amplification of neuropathic pain in the insular cortex

Shuang Qiu, Ming Zhang, Yan Liu, Yanyan Guo, Huan Zhao, Qian Song, Minggao Zhao, Richard L. Huganir, Jianhong Luo, Hui Xu, Min Zhuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Long-term potentiation of glutamatergic transmission has been observed after physiological learning or pathological injuries in different brain regions, including the spinal cord, hippocampus, amygdala, and cortices. The insular cortex is a key cortical region that plays important roles in aversive learning and neuropathic pain. However, little is known about whether excitatory transmission in the insular cortex undergoes plastic changes after peripheral nerve injury. Here, we found that peripheral nerve ligation triggered the enhancement of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in the insular cortex. The synaptic GluA1 subunit of AMPAR, but not the GluA2/3 subunit, was increased after nerve ligation. Genetic knock-in mice lacking phosphorylation of the Ser845 site, but not that of the Ser831 site, blocked the enhancement of the synaptic GluA1 subunit, indicating that GluA1 phosphorylation at the Ser845 site by protein kinase A (PKA) was critical for this upregulation after nerve injury. Furthermore, A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP79/ 150) and PKA were translocated to the synapses after nerve injury. Genetic deletion of adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 (AC1) prevented the translocation of AKAP79/150 and PKA, as well as the upregulation of synaptic GluA1-containing AMPARs. Pharmacological inhibition of calcium-permeable AMPAR function in the insular cortex reduced behavioral sensitization caused by nerve injury. Our results suggest that the expression of AMPARs is enhanced in the insular cortex after nerve injury by a pathway involving AC1, AKAP79/150, and PKA, and such enhancement may at least in part contribute to behavioral sensitization together with other cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate and the prefrontal cortices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13505-13515
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume34
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • GluA1
  • Insular cortex
  • Mouse
  • Neuropathic pain
  • PKA
  • Phosphorylation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Qiu, S., Zhang, M., Liu, Y., Guo, Y., Zhao, H., Song, Q., Zhao, M., Huganir, R. L., Luo, J., Xu, H., & Zhuo, M. (2014). GluA1 phosphorylation contributes to postsynaptic amplification of neuropathic pain in the insular cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(40), 13505-13515. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1431-14.2014