Global Scientific Production on Illicit Drug Addiction

A Two-Decade Analysis

Malahat Khalili, Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar, Behrang Shadloo, Ramin Mojtabai, Karl Mann, Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: Addiction science has made great progress in the past decades. We conducted a scientometric study in order to quantify the number of publications and the growth rate globally, regionally, and at country levels. Methods: In October 2015, we searched the Scopus database using the general keywords of addiction or drug-use disorders combined with specific terms regarding 4 groups of illicit drugs – cannabis, opioids, cocaine, and other stimulants or hallucinogens. All documents published during the 20-year period from 1995 to 2014 were included. Results: A total of 95,398 documents were retrieved. The highest number of documents were on opioids, both globally (60.1%) and in each of 5 continents. However, studies on cannabis showed a higher growth rate in the last 5-year period of the study (2010–2014). The United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Australia, France, Spain, Italy, China, and Japan – almost all studies were from high-income countries – occupied the top 10 positions and produced 81.4% of the global science on drug addiction. Conclusion: As there are important socio-cultural differences in the epidemiology and optimal clinical care of addictive disorders, it is suggested that low- and more affected middle-income countries increase their capacity to conduct research and disseminate the knowledge in this field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-70
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Addiction Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 6 2018

Fingerprint

drug dependence
Street Drugs
Cannabis
Opioid Analgesics
Substance-Related Disorders
Hallucinogens
addiction
Growth
Cocaine
Spain
Italy
France
Canada
Germany
Publications
income
China
Japan
Epidemiology
Databases

Keywords

  • Bibliometrics
  • Drug dependence
  • Geographic mapping
  • Scientometry
  • Substance abuse
  • World

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Khalili, M., Rahimi-Movaghar, A., Shadloo, B., Mojtabai, R., Mann, K., & Amin-Esmaeili, M. (Accepted/In press). Global Scientific Production on Illicit Drug Addiction: A Two-Decade Analysis. European Addiction Research, 60-70. https://doi.org/10.1159/000487590

Global Scientific Production on Illicit Drug Addiction : A Two-Decade Analysis. / Khalili, Malahat; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Shadloo, Behrang; Mojtabai, Ramin; Mann, Karl; Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh.

In: European Addiction Research, 06.04.2018, p. 60-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khalili, Malahat ; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin ; Shadloo, Behrang ; Mojtabai, Ramin ; Mann, Karl ; Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh. / Global Scientific Production on Illicit Drug Addiction : A Two-Decade Analysis. In: European Addiction Research. 2018 ; pp. 60-70.
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