Global ratings of patient satisfaction and perceptions of improvement with treatment for urinary incontinence: Validation of three global patient ratings

Kathryn L. Burgio, Patricia S. Goode, Holly E. Richter, Julie L. Locher, David L Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To test the validity of three patient global ratings, satisfaction, perception of improvement, and estimated percent improvement, for measuring outcomes of behavioral treatment for urinary incontinence. Methods: This report is a secondary analysis of data from three randomized controlled trials testing behavioral interventions for incontinence. Participants were 359 community-dwelling women, aged 40-92 years, with stress, urge, or mixed urinary incontinence. All participants received an 8-week program of clinic-based or self-administered behavioral training. Subjective outcomes included a patient satisfaction question (PSQ), global perception of improvement (GPI), and estimated percent improvement (EPI). Convergent validity was tested by examining the relationship between each measure and reduction of incontinence (bladder diary), change on the incontinence impact questionnaire (IIQ), and desire for another treatment. Discriminant validity was explored by examining the relationship of the global ratings to five measures not expected to be related to outcome (age, race, BMI, education level, and change in perceived pain). Results: All three patient global ratings were significantly associated with each other (P <0.0001), with diary measures of reduction of incontinence episodes (P <0.0001), and change in the IIQ (P <0.005), and inversely associated with desire for another treatment (P <0.0001). All three patient ratings were not significantly associated with age, race, BMI, education level, or change in perceived pain. Conclusion: Patient global ratings of satisfaction, perception of improvement, and estimated percent improvement have acceptable convergent and discriminant validity for measuring outcomes in studies of behavioral treatment for urinary incontinence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-417
Number of pages7
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Incontinence
Patient Satisfaction
Independent Living
Education
Pain
Therapeutics
Urinary Bladder
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Behavior therapy
  • Outcomes assessment
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Validation study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Nephrology
  • Urology

Cite this

Global ratings of patient satisfaction and perceptions of improvement with treatment for urinary incontinence : Validation of three global patient ratings. / Burgio, Kathryn L.; Goode, Patricia S.; Richter, Holly E.; Locher, Julie L.; Roth, David L.

In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2006, p. 411-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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